First Fish thread

#1
Hey all. I thought it would be fun to start a thread about all of ya'lls earliest fishing memories. If this has already been done I apologize but
what the heck... sometimes it's fun to freshly rehash old memories (new thread for old memories?)

My first fishing memory is at Jenks Lake up on the way to Big Bear Lake in Southern California. It was probably 1978 or 1979. My
family was up there for a picnic... Parents, younger sister, cousins, and grandparents. This was before there was anything built around the lake.
There were some massive tree trunks floating in the lake that we loved to swim out and play on. I remember trying to stand on it as it would
roll beneath us, slick from moss growing on it and unstable as it would roll. Kids laughing and playing lumberjack seeing how long we could
stay afoot standing on it.

But this is a fishing memory so this story should focus on the fishing.

I still remember my father's yellow plastic tackle box. It had one old red and white daredevil lure, an assortment of smallish brass treble hooks, a couple bobbers, and some egg sinkers. My father wasn't a fisherman. His default rig was a Carolina rig and I'm not sure if he even knew any other rigs. There was a container Zeke's garlic cheese bait and there always seemed to be a half full container of Fire Balls salmon eggs. Red straw-like hook remover tool. To this day I'm not sure if he knew how to tie anything else or if he even knew any knots other than basic square knots.

He set up my pole, a little Zebco child's button activated pole. He rigged it and I proudly put the nightcrawler on the hook myself. Cast it out. My father had a pole in the water, and my grandmother was also fishing. I was the only one getting bites. Small trout, one after another. No idea what kind they were but most likely they were either brookies or rainbow. I don't know how many fish I caught that day, and they weren't large... not even pan-sized and before going home they were all released I think. Or maybe my grandmother kept then. I don't remember eating them. Just the warm summer day on the lakeshore with family members who have been gone for years. Basking in the pride and jealousy of my father ("Beginner's luck!"). And enjoying his smile as he fished next to me.

I skunk more frequently than I catch, but whenever I touch a pole flashes of that day pass through my mind. It doesn't matter the type of pole or where I'm fishing. It's
not whole reminiscences. Just glimpses, but the brief flashes of remembered happiness keeps me reaching for my tackle box over and over again. Over the years new memories have been added on. Late-nights in San Leandro marina fishing the bay with friends, meeting up to wet a line after work or bouts of late-night fishing watching movies on an iPad in the dark listening for the bells on our rods to ring. Showing up and not caring that the waterline was 50 yards away from the rock wall of the jetty when we happened to show up on a very low tide.

I miss those days, and look forward to the ones ahead, and of new friends and new experiences gradually becoming more fond memories.
 
#3
Hey all. I thought it would be fun to start a thread about all of ya'lls earliest fishing memories. If this has already been done I apologize but
what the heck... sometimes it's fun to freshly rehash old memories (new thread for old memories?)

My first fishing memory is at Jenks Lake up on the way to Big Bear Lake in Southern California. It was probably 1978 or 1979. My
family was up there for a picnic... Parents, younger sister, cousins, and grandparents. This was before there was anything built around the lake.
There were some massive tree trunks floating in the lake that we loved to swim out and play on. I remember trying to stand on it as it would
roll beneath us, slick from moss growing on it and unstable as it would roll. Kids laughing and playing lumberjack seeing how long we could
stay afoot standing on it.

But this is a fishing memory so this story should focus on the fishing.

I still remember my father's yellow plastic tackle box. It had one old red and white daredevil lure, an assortment of smallish brass treble hooks, a couple bobbers, and some egg sinkers. My father wasn't a fisherman. His default rig was a Carolina rig and I'm not sure if he even knew any other rigs. There was a container Zeke's garlic cheese bait and there always seemed to be a half full container of Fire Balls salmon eggs. Red straw-like hook remover tool. To this day I'm not sure if he knew how to tie anything else or if he even knew any knots other than basic square knots.

He set up my pole, a little Zebco child's button activated pole. He rigged it and I proudly put the nightcrawler on the hook myself. Cast it out. My father had a pole in the water, and my grandmother was also fishing. I was the only one getting bites. Small trout, one after another. No idea what kind they were but most likely they were either brookies or rainbow. I don't know how many fish I caught that day, and they weren't large... not even pan-sized and before going home they were all released I think. Or maybe my grandmother kept then. I don't remember eating them. Just the warm summer day on the lakeshore with family members who have been gone for years. Basking in the pride and jealousy of my father ("Beginner's luck!"). And enjoying his smile as he fished next to me.

I skunk more frequently than I catch, but whenever I touch a pole flashes of that day pass through my mind. It doesn't matter the type of pole or where I'm fishing. It's
not whole reminiscences. Just glimpses, but the brief flashes of remembered happiness keeps me reaching for my tackle box over and over again. Over the years new memories have been added on. Late-nights in San Leandro marina fishing the bay with friends, meeting up to wet a line after work or bouts of late-night fishing watching movies on an iPad in the dark listening for the bells on our rods to ring. Showing up and not caring that the waterline was 50 yards away from the rock wall of the jetty when we happened to show up on a very low tide.

I miss those days, and look forward to the ones ahead, and of new friends and new experiences gradually becoming more fond memories.
Jenks Lake is one of my favorite fishing spots. I've caught countless small bass and sunfish off of the pier by the main parking lot, and to this day, this lake is one of the only freshwater fishing spots that I go to and expect to catch fish. And if the fish aren't biting at the lake, the Santa Ana River South Fork is a short drive away, where trout are always biting in the cool shade. With its beautiful scenery and quiet location in the San Bernardino Mountains, the Jenks Lake Pier is one of my favorite fishing piers in California, even though it is not located in the Pacific Ocean or the Sacramento River.
 
#4
Jenks Lake is one of my favorite fishing spots. I've caught countless small bass and sunfish off of the pier by the main parking lot, and to this day, this lake is one of the only freshwater fishing spots that I go to and expect to catch fish. And if the fish aren't biting at the lake, the Santa Ana River South Fork is a short drive away, where trout are always biting in the cool shade. With its beautiful scenery and quiet location in the San Bernardino Mountains, the Jenks Lake Pier is one of my favorite fishing piers in California, even though it is not located in the Pacific Ocean or the Sacramento River.
I live in Moreno Valley... try to hit the coast most Saturdays. Haven't been to Jenks Lake in years. Let me know if you ever want to wet a line! I've never tried fishing Santa Ana River. Do you fly fish there, or still use standard gear?
 
#6
I live in Moreno Valley... try to hit the coast most Saturdays. Haven't been to Jenks Lake in years. Let me know if you ever want to wet a line! I've never tried fishing Santa Ana River. Do you fly fish there, or still use standard gear?
Most of the other fishermen I see are fly-fishing, but I just use standard gear. I used to use Powerbait or Mouse Tails on a carolina rig with a size 8 live bait hook, but now I just use a Kastmaster and make 3-5 casts in each pool in the creek. If no trout bite, I move on to the next pool.