Avalon 1/9

#1
Between a nasty bout of COVID and finals in early December, I didn't leave the house until I tested negative on the very last day of the year. Naturally, the first thing I did once I finally broke out of quarantine was go fishing.

I took the 7 am ferry out of Long Beach. As the boat neared the island, I noticed all the construction equipment and barriers around the Mole were gone. Even closer, I noticed some people standing around on its deck, a few with lines in the water. The Cabrillo Mole was finally open, after over a year of construction.
File_000.jpeg
I naturally started off fishing the Mole, throwing out a dropper loop with some old frozen chunks of mackerel. My first fish of 2021 was a short calico:
File_001.jpeg
There were two other anglers on the Mole, and they were doing decently well on cut squid. I fished the bubble and feather while the bait rod soaked, and around 9, I got my first missed strike. I landed one bonito shortly afterwards, and lent the other anglers spare bubbles and flies. They managed to land one bonito, while I popped off several more. Then suddenly as they appeared, the bones disappeared.
File_002.jpeg
The wind picked up pretty severely afterwards, and I only caught one small whitefish. The other anglers caught two just-legal sheephead and a huge scorpionfish. When the wind died down around 10:30, I tried throwing the splasher again for little luck. I then switched to a 42 gram coltsniper and bombed it out as far as I could. On the drop, it got picked up by a very nice fish that came off next to the pier. The next cast yielded another bonito. The other anglers began catching too, and until 12, there was very fast action on bones as long as I could get a jig out, with a fish every cast. I was also surprised by a few short calico that hit on the drop. I limited out and continued catching and releasing fish until the wind picked up again, and it became difficult to cast. By now the other anglers left, and I was alone on the pier.
File_006.jpeg
The rest of the day was much slower, but despite the wind, the weather was pretty nice, and I relaxed a bit. I caught a small moray around 2, and had a couple missed hits on cut bait. At 3, the wind finally died down and I started fishing frozen peas for perch. I caught one decent opaleye and halfmoon, with a couple short calico and smaller perch mixed in. At 3:40, I hooked a large opaleye, one that would definitely snap my line if I tried to hoist it over the railing. Luckily for me, a new group of anglers had set up next to me, and they helped me land it using my bucket and rope. This fish taped out at 16".
File_004.jpeg
I switched back to fishing strips of squid on a dropper loop, and I caught a couple short sheephead, while my neighbors also caught some of the same. At one point one of them hooked a decent 16" sheephead, and I returned the favor and helped them land it. They graciously offered the fish to me, since they were fishing only for fun. (Sheephead is open year-round to shore-based anglers) As it got darker, mackerel began hitting my baits as they sank, and I couldn't fish the bottom anymore. I caught a couple mackerel, one more small moray and (thankfully) broke off another very large eel next to the pier before I took the 6:30 boat home.
File_005.jpeg

The Mole itself hasn't changed much, the most notable changes being one more trash can and the removal of a bench from the northern corner. The deck material was also changed. The new deck annoyingly puts off a lot of sand and other particulate, which stuck to fish as they hit the deck and made for ugly pictures.
File_003.jpeg
 

evanluck

Active member
#5
I'm considering trying this on Saturday. Is it an easy walk from the boat dock to the Mole? How much gear do you bring? Do you bring a cart?

Thanks,

Evan

Between a nasty bout of COVID and finals in early December, I didn't leave the house until I tested negative on the very last day of the year. Naturally, the first thing I did once I finally broke out of quarantine was go fishing.

I took the 7 am ferry out of Long Beach. As the boat neared the island, I noticed all the construction equipment and barriers around the Mole were gone. Even closer, I noticed some people standing around on its deck, a few with lines in the water. The Cabrillo Mole was finally open, after over a year of construction.
View attachment 1879
I naturally started off fishing the Mole, throwing out a dropper loop with some old frozen chunks of mackerel. My first fish of 2021 was a short calico:
View attachment 1880
There were two other anglers on the Mole, and they were doing decently well on cut squid. I fished the bubble and feather while the bait rod soaked, and around 9, I got my first missed strike. I landed one bonito shortly afterwards, and lent the other anglers spare bubbles and flies. They managed to land one bonito, while I popped off several more. Then suddenly as they appeared, the bones disappeared.
View attachment 1883
The wind picked up pretty severely afterwards, and I only caught one small whitefish. The other anglers caught two just-legal sheephead and a huge scorpionfish. When the wind died down around 10:30, I tried throwing the splasher again for little luck. I then switched to a 42 gram coltsniper and bombed it out as far as I could. On the drop, it got picked up by a very nice fish that came off next to the pier. The next cast yielded another bonito. The other anglers began catching too, and until 12, there was very fast action on bones as long as I could get a jig out, with a fish every cast. I was also surprised by a few short calico that hit on the drop. I limited out and continued catching and releasing fish until the wind picked up again, and it became difficult to cast. By now the other anglers left, and I was alone on the pier.
View attachment 1885
The rest of the day was much slower, but despite the wind, the weather was pretty nice, and I relaxed a bit. I caught a small moray around 2, and had a couple missed hits on cut bait. At 3, the wind finally died down and I started fishing frozen peas for perch. I caught one decent opaleye and halfmoon, with a couple short calico and smaller perch mixed in. At 3:40, I hooked a large opaleye, one that would definitely snap my line if I tried to hoist it over the railing. Luckily for me, a new group of anglers had set up next to me, and they helped me land it using my bucket and rope. This fish taped out at 16".
View attachment 1882
I switched back to fishing strips of squid on a dropper loop, and I caught a couple short sheephead, while my neighbors also caught some of the same. At one point one of them hooked a decent 16" sheephead, and I returned the favor and helped them land it. They graciously offered the fish to me, since they were fishing only for fun. (Sheephead is open year-round to shore-based anglers) As it got darker, mackerel began hitting my baits as they sank, and I couldn't fish the bottom anymore. I caught a couple mackerel, one more small moray and (thankfully) broke off another very large eel next to the pier before I took the 6:30 boat home.
View attachment 1881

The Mole itself hasn't changed much, the most notable changes being one more trash can and the removal of a bench from the northern corner. The deck material was also changed. The new deck annoyingly puts off a lot of sand and other particulate, which stuck to fish as they hit the deck and made for ugly pictures.
View attachment 1884
 
#6
I'm considering trying this on Saturday. Is it an easy walk from the boat dock to the Mole? How much gear do you bring? Do you bring a cart?

Thanks,

Evan
The Mole is on the other side of the unloading dock, thus its incredibly convenient to fish there. I bring three rods, a light 6 lb class spinning setup, a 15 lb class baitcasting setup, and a 30 lb class conventional rod. I bring a rolling cooler with a bucket and rope. As for bait, I usually bring two bags of frozen peas, half a pound to a pound of head-on shrimp (head on only because it's the cheapest I can get), a small box of squid, and 5-6 frozen mackerel. Tacklewise I bring at least 10 2-3 oz torpedo sinkers, mosquito hooks in sizes 10, 1-2, and reasonably strong 2/0-3/0 circle hooks. I also bring swivels of varying sizes and clear steelhead bobbers for fishing peas, and of course the splasher and jigs (generally heavier ones). I bring 4 lb, 15 lb, and 20 lb fluoro leader. The Vons is very far from the Mole so I suggest bringing your own ice.
 

evanluck

Active member
#7
The Mole is on the other side of the unloading dock, thus its incredibly convenient to fish there. I bring three rods, a light 6 lb class spinning setup, a 15 lb class baitcasting setup, and a 30 lb class conventional rod. I bring a rolling cooler with a bucket and rope. As for bait, I usually bring two bags of frozen peas, half a pound to a pound of head-on shrimp (head on only because it's the cheapest I can get), a small box of squid, and 5-6 frozen mackerel. Tacklewise I bring at least 10 2-3 oz torpedo sinkers, mosquito hooks in sizes 10, 1-2, and reasonably strong 2/0-3/0 circle hooks. I also bring swivels of varying sizes and clear steelhead bobbers for fishing peas, and of course the splasher and jigs (generally heavier ones). I bring 4 lb, 15 lb, and 20 lb fluoro leader. The Vons is very far from the Mole so I suggest bringing your own ice.
Thanks for the very thorough answer. So helpful!
 
#8
Between a nasty bout of COVID and finals in early December, I didn't leave the house until I tested negative on the very last day of the year. Naturally, the first thing I did once I finally broke out of quarantine was go fishing.

I took the 7 am ferry out of Long Beach. As the boat neared the island, I noticed all the construction equipment and barriers around the Mole were gone. Even closer, I noticed some people standing around on its deck, a few with lines in the water. The Cabrillo Mole was finally open, after over a year of construction.
View attachment 1879
I naturally started off fishing the Mole, throwing out a dropper loop with some old frozen chunks of mackerel. My first fish of 2021 was a short calico:
View attachment 1880
There were two other anglers on the Mole, and they were doing decently well on cut squid. I fished the bubble and feather while the bait rod soaked, and around 9, I got my first missed strike. I landed one bonito shortly afterwards, and lent the other anglers spare bubbles and flies. They managed to land one bonito, while I popped off several more. Then suddenly as they appeared, the bones disappeared.
View attachment 1883
The wind picked up pretty severely afterwards, and I only caught one small whitefish. The other anglers caught two just-legal sheephead and a huge scorpionfish. When the wind died down around 10:30, I tried throwing the splasher again for little luck. I then switched to a 42 gram coltsniper and bombed it out as far as I could. On the drop, it got picked up by a very nice fish that came off next to the pier. The next cast yielded another bonito. The other anglers began catching too, and until 12, there was very fast action on bones as long as I could get a jig out, with a fish every cast. I was also surprised by a few short calico that hit on the drop. I limited out and continued catching and releasing fish until the wind picked up again, and it became difficult to cast. By now the other anglers left, and I was alone on the pier.
View attachment 1885
The rest of the day was much slower, but despite the wind, the weather was pretty nice, and I relaxed a bit. I caught a small moray around 2, and had a couple missed hits on cut bait. At 3, the wind finally died down and I started fishing frozen peas for perch. I caught one decent opaleye and halfmoon, with a couple short calico and smaller perch mixed in. At 3:40, I hooked a large opaleye, one that would definitely snap my line if I tried to hoist it over the railing. Luckily for me, a new group of anglers had set up next to me, and they helped me land it using my bucket and rope. This fish taped out at 16".
View attachment 1882
I switched back to fishing strips of squid on a dropper loop, and I caught a couple short sheephead, while my neighbors also caught some of the same. At one point one of them hooked a decent 16" sheephead, and I returned the favor and helped them land it. They graciously offered the fish to me, since they were fishing only for fun. (Sheephead is open year-round to shore-based anglers) As it got darker, mackerel began hitting my baits as they sank, and I couldn't fish the bottom anymore. I caught a couple mackerel, one more small moray and (thankfully) broke off another very large eel next to the pier before I took the 6:30 boat home.
View attachment 1881

The Mole itself hasn't changed much, the most notable changes being one more trash can and the removal of a bench from the northern corner. The deck material was also changed. The new deck annoyingly puts off a lot of sand and other particulate, which stuck to fish as they hit the deck and made for ugly pictures.
View attachment 1884
Thanks for the report. Appreciate it! Glad to hear the Mole is open. 👍
 

Mahigeer

Active member
#9
I'm considering trying this on Saturday. Is it an easy walk from the boat dock to the Mole? How much gear do you bring? Do you bring a cart?


Thanks,

Evan
Good thing he beat me to answering what to bring. I am known to over-pack.

Thanks for the post. It seems you did not know about the Mole being open, when you decided to go.


The Catalina Express catamaran boats from Long Beach land at the #1 gate at the Mole about 30-40 steps from the railing!


The CE crew are relaxed about luggage “except” four wheeled carts. However, the collapsible grocery type carts are ok. Even though they have four wheels. You do not have to collapse them.



Good luck.
 
#10
Thanks for weighing in with this detail about the carts. I was just pondering wether or not I should bring my collapsible grocery cart!
Good thing he beat me to answering what to bring. I am known to over-pack.

Thanks for the post. It seems you did not know about the Mole being open, when you decided to go.


The Catalina Express catamaran boats from Long Beach land at the #1 gate at the Mole about 30-40 steps from the railing!


The CE crew are relaxed about luggage “except” four wheeled carts. However, the collapsible grocery type carts are ok. Even though they have four wheels. You do not have to collapse them.



Good luck.
th this detail
Good thing he beat me to answering what to bring. I am known to over-pack.

Thanks for the post. It seems you did not know about the Mole being open, when you decided to go.


The Catalina Express catamaran boats from Long Beach land at the #1 gate at the Mole about 30-40 steps from the railing!


The CE crew are relaxed about luggage “except” four wheeled carts. However, the collapsible grocery type carts are ok. Even though they have four wheels. You do not have to collapse them.



Good luck.
 
#12
The grids on the floor are at the same location. So it should give you an idea how close to the railing is the boat ramp.







After many experiments with different carts, this is my latest. Like I mentioned, I over-pack. This was for an over-night lobster trip. Many items were needed.





Lastly, from the looks of it, it seems my fishing regulation plaques (for lack of better term) have been reinstalled. Glad to see that.
 
#13
Seems like there should be images in your message but I don't see them.

The grids on the floor are at the same location. So it should give you an idea how close to the railing is the boat ramp.







After many experiments with different carts, this is my latest. Like I mentioned, I over-pack. This was for an over-night lobster trip. Many items were needed.





Lastly, from the looks of it, it seems my fishing regulation plaques (for lack of better term) have been reinstalled. Glad to see that.