500 Juvenille California Halibut Released Into the Wild

Ken Jones

Administrator
Staff member
#4
When I was on the Bay-Delta Stamp Committee back about a decade ago the committee recommended and voted for a project to raise and release California halibut in San Francisco Bay near Alameda. The Fish and Game Director vetoed our vote saying that California halibut were not native to San Francisco Bay and thus the Fish and Game Department felt it was a poor use of money. We disagreed but all projects had to be approved by the Director. It was one of many projects we pushed that actually involved fish but by and large the department seemed to have its own agenda and preferences. After many years and many hours of meetings no one on the committee voluntered for another term (and it was an impressive group of people). One of the negative lessons in dealing with the department.
 

Stickman

Well-known member
#6
"After many years and many hours of meetings no one on the committee volunteered for another term (and it was an impressive group of people). One of the negative lessons in dealing with the department."

That is a very sad story, Mr. Ken. Thank you for your time spent serving on that committee. It is yet one of thousands of examples of our government (local, State, and federal) ruling AGAIST the will of the people. We are all so used to it now that we scarcely notice anymore. It can be very discouraging. Having said that, it is very evident that you, and the folks that read and contribute to these message boards have NOT given in to negativity and continue to celebrate and fight for our freedom to fish and for the promotion of good fisheries management.

KEEP THE FAITH.
 

SC McCarty

Well-known member
#7
When I was on the Bay-Delta Stamp Committee back about a decade ago the committee recommended and voted for a project to raise and release California halibut in San Francisco Bay near Alameda. The Fish and Game Director vetoed our vote saying that California halibut were not native to San Francisco Bay and thus the Fish and Game Department felt it was a poor use of money. . .
Time has shown that California Halibut are native to the bay area, but it also appears that the expenditure was unnecessary, since recent halibut fishing appears to be better in the bay area, without having to plant juveniles, than Southern California.

Steve
 

Ken Jones

Administrator
Staff member
#8
Yes, I find it interesting that halibut fishing does appear more successful today in SF Bay than down south. It's especially rare to see a legal-size halibut caught on a SoCal pier today. Still, with all the pressure you see today on halibut in the bay, you wonder if it can continue. It would have been nice raising halibut at Alameda much like white seabass (and now halibut) down south.
 

Skyhook

Active member
#9
It almost sounds bizarre to even say this, but one day halibut might replace stripers as San Francisco Bay's preeminent game fish. It's clear the striper fishery is continuing to decline, while halibut seem to be caught in large numbers in recent seasons.

As SC McCarty said, time has shown that the fish are native to the Bay. Given that, it might be time for the CADFW to re-examine regulations and limit protections for these fish.
 
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