Updated bonito article —

#2
I’ve caught some pretty large “boat sized” bonito myself at Imperial Beach pier but in the mid 90s I know my older bro caught one at Oceanside that was the biggest I’ve ever seen caught from a pier. I had to fillet and clean it. It took up a big portion of the kitchen counter top.

Pepper Park in National City had some large specimens, when nobody knew about them, but fishing pressure is keeping them small now. Some times you can see the boils of bait fish being chased up and down the Sweetwater River channel from the 5 freeway.
 

Ken Jones

Administrator
Staff member
#4
It would be interesting to tie a ten pound bonito to a ten pound yellowtail. They fight differently but it would be a heck of a fight. I imagine though that the bonito would wear itself out more quickly.
 
#5
It would be interesting to tie a ten pound bonito to a ten pound yellowtail. They fight differently but it would be a heck of a fight. I imagine though that the bonito would wear itself out more quickly.
Yea, I believe the bonito would wear itself out quickly. (y)
 
#6
Did you hear about the big baby Broomtail Grouper that was caught at Pepper Park last year? I could just imagine a full grown grouper gulping up bite sized bonito, maybe even mullet.

I wasn’t there but there was also a Black Seabass hooked and cut loose at Imperial Beach Pier earlier this year.
 

Mahigeer

Well-known member
#9
I keep a small laminated of this picture in my wallet to show to anyone who says bonito is a trash fish.





This was prepared by partner of Stoked on Fishing company.

Turks also like to eat bonito. It all depends on how it is prepared.
 

Ken Jones

Administrator
Staff member
#10
Back in the days when bonito were considered trash fish anglers tended to have a different perspective than today. Good fish was white-fleshed, mild-flavored fish that could be fried. It took ethnic fisherman teaching other anglers different cooking methods, and how to use spices to accompany and compliment the darker, stronger flavored fish, to convince people bonito weren't too bad. In addition, in the '60s they were very common but so were bass and barracuda and other white-fleshed fish. People chose those fish and used bonito for fertilizer (my mom had great rose gardens). In addition, too many anglers were not a conscious on how to keep the fish fresh and simply caught a bonito, left it laying in the sun, put it in a gunnysack or into a plastic bag. Let 'em heat up and bloody, oily fish tend to break down faster. There were a whole lot of things done wrong as well as different perspectives. Most people still have favorite favorite fish for eating and bonito is usually not at the top (compare it to bluefin, yellowfin, and albacore) but it also shouldn't be at the bottom.

A memory — in 1968 I took a 1/2-day trip out from Davey's Locker (Newport Beach) on the Del Mar. The people wanted some good eating fish — bass, rockfish, sculpin (scorpionfish), etc. Everyone was using three-four hook ganions (leaders) and planning to drop them to the bottom. The first stop we made everyone made their drop and almost immediately were hooked up to 3-4 bonito. Tough fights and tangled lines but most people got their bonito (that no one really wanted). We mad a slight move and the same thing was repeated, the line went down 20-30 feet and every hook was grabbed by a bonito. Finally the skipped in disgust said we've got to make a longer move to get away from these "God ... bonito." In those years the bonito were almost too thick at times and much like today when the mackerel are thick, some people just didn't have as much respect for them.
 
#11
I keep a small laminated of this picture in my wallet to show to anyone who says bonito is a trash fish.





This was prepared by partner of Stoked on Fishing company.

Turks also like to eat bonito. It all depends on how it is prepared.
Wow! How do you make that? I find bonito pretty limited in its culinary preparation.
 
#14
Then there's always those black skipjack. I hear they are the least edible.
Lol Yes! I learned that the hard way trying to cook the “extras” I had.

First, bleeding IS a must! Second, DON’T put a lot of heat to it. A fast outer torching is ok but it’s best left mostly raw. (unless you are making cat food) In accordance to the regular seasoning you would use for raw fish, fragrant seasoning like, chili flakes, sesame oil, extra ginger, and mint leaves are a must.

My only issue with bonito is that the meat gets extra tough when it’s cooked. So I mostly eat them freshly raw or smoked. They are very good smoked BTW.(y) Been looking for better ways to cook them but I can’t seem to find any. I’ve even given fillets to people who are very good cooks. “Oh yea! I know how to cook them!” Then they send a pic back to me of a fried “BRICK” of bonito. Lol I’m just like, “Ummm Ok! Glad to help out. Enjoy your meal.” Hehe So yea, bonito don’t have a bad taste at all. They just get tough when cooked.
 

EgoNonBaptizo

Well-known member
#15
Personally I like panko breaded and fried bonito. To keep it from drying out I keep cook times somewhat shorter than usual, and it turns out great. Grilled is good, but again short cook times are a must. Though I'd take raw over cooked any day. Come to think of it, it's been a couple years since I've caught a bonito of any size.
 
#16
Sounds good! I’m gonna try that. So it’s sort of like a quick outer sear with a breaded layer. Hmm It’s making me hungry. (y)

I’ve also prepared bonito slightly grilled, raw inside, brushed with seasoned olive oil. SO GOOD also.