Surf Fishing- Hard Baits Question

MisterT

Well-known member
#1
Hello Everyone.

I always had this question in the back of my mind and wanted to see your feedback.

Why is the Lucky Craft Flash Minnow 110 so popular for surf fishing? Is it the size? Or swimming action? or diving depth (1-2 ft)?

This year I starting out surf fishing and I managed to get a small halibut (around the shores nearby Balboa Pier) on a SP Minnow (Sinking) which I believe could be out of luck. Additionally caught a decent sized spotfin croaker on the shores of Long Beach with a SP Minnow Bullet. (Spotfin felt like it attacked the SP Minnow Bullet which hit like pretty hard--caught me off guard.)

With the above question I wonder if maybe I'm using the wrong lures at the wrong time? Seems like the shores are pretty shallow so shallow diving lures like the Lucky Craft are better suited? or perhaps I am wrong?

Going to try the Lucky Craft more often next year.

Just wanted to see your feedback. :)
 

Mahigeer

Well-known member
#2
I think the size and shape of 110 is helping the catch rate.

Since you are fishing in Southern California, I recommend joining the SC surf fishing website. Lots of great members who do surf fishing there. They can share their knowledge.

I am known there as "fener" there. I have many posts, but not on surf fishing.

If fishing at Balboa pier on Tuesday and Thursday, look for Halibut queen, a nicest lady angler you will ever meet.

Snookie.
 
#3
Hi Mahigeer:

Happen to have that website address for SC Surf fishing group? Also, do you have favorite surf fishing "chosen territory" for So Cal geography, considering that section from Seal Beach to Newport jetty?

Happy holiday hah!

Larry
 

K1n

Active member
#4
I'm not going to knock the LC minnows because they do catch fish. However, as Mahi stated, it's also a size/baitfish comparison too. SP minnows are a staple for larger game such as stripers, calicos, barricuda etc. However, if you fish anything similar to an LC, say yozuri or an xrap, you will get good results too. Also, a vast majority of folks are using LCs so it artificially skews the results in favor of LCs. Dont be afraid to try other lures, more often than not, if it has a good wobble and casts well, it'll catch fish.
Lastly, learn how to read surf structure. It changes all the time and usually you can maximize your chances of success if you fish areas that are more likely to hold fish.
 

MisterT

Well-known member
#5
I'm not going to knock the LC minnows because they do catch fish. However, as Mahi stated, it's also a size/baitfish comparison too. SP minnows are a staple for larger game such as stripers, calicos, barricuda etc. However, if you fish anything similar to an LC, say yozuri or an xrap, you will get good results too. Also, a vast majority of folks are using LCs so it artificially skews the results in favor of LCs. Dont be afraid to try other lures, more often than not, if it has a good wobble and casts well, it'll catch fish.
Lastly, learn how to read surf structure. It changes all the time and usually you can maximize your chances of success if you fish areas that are more likely to hold fish.

Thanks I plan on experimenting with various lures. You are definitely right about reading the beach. I gotta get better at doing that!
 
#8
My two problems with Hardbaits is that they are an expensive option and big Halibut bite them in half. I stick with soft baits, either drop shot or jighead. Cheap and effective. This years color was pearl, last year chartreuse.
 

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MisterT

Well-known member
#9
My two problems with Hardbaits is that they are an expensive option and big Halibut bite them in half. I stick with soft baits, either drop shot or jighead. Cheap and effective. This years color was pearl, last year chartreuse.
What weight jig head do you recommend? I've seen YouTube videos of individuals bouncing the jig head off the bottom (on slack line).
 
I

ILYA

Guest
#10
It is depending from current. If current slow, light jig heads about 1/4oz working better on fall, imitating wounded prey. If current strong, it could be about 1 and 1/2oz.
 
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#11
Jigs are useful in SF bay from 1/8 to a couple ounces, for most gamefish pursued. The key to jig fishing is finding the right weight/speed for the depth and current you’re fishing. Easier said then done...honestly took me around 3 years to get to grips with it, and close to 10 to be consistent. Worth the work, if you want to catch. Easily the most productive bait in my plug bag, and in good hands can outperform live bait.
The only hard baits I fish are either topwater plugs or lipped floating/suspending plugs, to fish specific parts of the water column. I find it easier to fish jigs I need to push deeper than that. And honestly, often jigs are the ticket for mid - near surface work too.
As long as your plug is swimming well and not tossed around, and your connected and feel you’re where you need to be, fish it. Don’t worry about other guys opinions too much; it’s the fishes opinion that matters. Good luck!