Rod limits for crabbing and rockfish fishing

#1
Can we get a definitive answer to whether we can have two rods in the water in a jetty or a pier if one rod is for crabbing and one rod is for fishing for rockfish? Obviously, if the rod have a snare, we are not targeting rockfish. It would be nice not to have a gray area and open up for interpretation.
 
#2
There has never been anything gray about it. One line only. Even a crab ring is considered one line. Obviously a line attached to a pole...one line. Makes no difference where you are fishing, whether boat, shore, jetty or pier. This is a federally managed species and they would tell you if there were exceptions. This is the pertinent section in the regulations (colored red just for you):

§ 28.55. Rockfish (Sebastes).
(a) Open areas, seasons, and depth constraints: See Section 27.20 through Section 27.50 for definitions, special closure areas, and exceptions. Take and possession is authorized as follows:
(1) Northern Groundfish Management Area: Open and closed dates and depth constraints as defined by Section 27.25.
(2) Mendocino Groundfish Management Area: Open and closed dates and depth constraints as defined by Section 27.30.
(3) San Francisco Groundfish Management Area: Open and closed dates and depth constraints as defined by Section 27.35.
(4) Central Groundfish Management Area: Open and closed dates and depth constraints as defined by Section 27.40.
(5) Southern Groundfish Management Area: Open and closed dates and depth constraints as defined by Section 27.45.
(6) Cowcod Conservation Areas: Open and closed dates and depths constraints as defined by Section 27.50. Only Nearshore Rockfish, and Shelf Rockfish, as defined in subsections 1.91(a)(1) and 1.91(a)(3), may be taken and possessed, except as provided below in subsection (b)(1).
(b) Limit: Ten, within the Rockfish, Cabezon, and Greenling complex (RCG complex, as defined in Section 1.91) limit of 10 fish, in any combination of species, except as provided below.
(1) The limit on bronzespotted rockfish, cowcod, and yelloweye rockfish is zero. These species shall not be taken or possessed as part of the RCG limit.
(2) The limit on canary rockfish is two fish, within the RCG bag limit.
(3) The limit on black rockfish is three fish, within the RCG limit.
(4) In the Cowcod Conservation Areas (see Section 27.50), the limit on slope rockfish, as defined in subsection 1.91(a)(4), is zero. These species shall not be taken or possessed as part of the RCG limit in the Cowcod Conservation Areas.
(c) Size limit: None.
(d) Method of take: When angling, gear is restricted to not more than two hooks and
one line. For purposes of this section, a hook is a single hook, or a double or treble hook with multiple points connected to a common shank.
(e) Fishing rules for rockfish may be changed during the year or in-season by the department under the authority of subsection 27.20(e). See subsection 27.20(f) for additional information.

Note: Authority cited: Sections 200, 205, 265, 702, 7071 and 8587.1, Fish and Game Code. Reference: Sections 200, 205, 265, 1802, 7071 and 8585.5, Fish and Game Code; 50 CFR Part 660, Subpart G; and 14 CCR 27.20.
 
#3
Thanks for that info. I will try not try to fish and crab at the same time. How about those on a boat that drop a crab trap and go rockfish fishing? Just for argument sake, one line is used for rockfish fishing and one use for crab snaring. I understand that I can't say 1 rod is targeting rockfish and another one is targeting perch, since I can't proof that, but for a snare, it's pretty obvious it's not targeting rockfish. The one line is still targeting rockfish and the other line is not. It is still technically one line targeting rockfish. There is nowhere in that statement that you can't drop another line. It just states one line for rockfish, hence need some clarification.
 
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#4
No one can prove Intent.* Thank heavens for that! I think the only way the DFW would have a case is if one was using a prescribed sturgeon claw rig in a closed area. Even then, it's iffy. Boats get around the dropped traps and continued fishing by "boat limits,' that wonderful law maneuvered by the sportfishing lobby. The bone that was offered to shoreliners was keeping rockfish open for us all year.

Personally I think a lot of the rules are nit-picking and asinine. (For example, most of us would gladly buy a two-pole stamp if we could use it in the Bay. in boats or onshore.) But I don't want to have to go to Sacramento and prove my innocence.

What you do is your business, naturally. Just don't say you are targeting rockfish. In the meantime, because some of the DFW wardens are not as well informed about the rules as (I think) they should be, make sure you have a copy of the regulations with you. It has saved me a lot of hassle over the years.


*Take is something else entirely. You cannot target a fish on the no-take list and you must return an incidental catch to the water immediately. Even taking a picture constitutes a violation of the law. Carrie Wilson of the DFW confirmed this for me years ago.