Micro Jigs for Vertical Jigging

DSRTEGL

Well-known member
#1
For years now....Vertical Jigging for Big Perch at certain pier and shore locations has been kind of an obsession with me. I have always used Kastmaster Spoons, Small Krocodiles, or Home Made Jigs......BUT......Now I see these things........Has anybody tried them yet for Perchin?........The price certainly seems to be right at $12-13 for 5 with Free Shipping.

.56" and 1.16oz
61sDCiE832L._SL1001_.jpg

AND THESE

.56" and .88oz

713-V-jQaBL._SL1500_.jpg


YouTube video review of the jigs above........IN JAPANESE UNFORTUNATELY......But you get the idea


Refurbishing the same jigs.......
 
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DSRTEGL

Well-known member
#2
Hmmmmm..........Looks like I get to experiment making my own......The treble hooks were going to be taken off anyway and replace with assist hooks......Guess I have time to make some waiting for the rain to start and the smoke to clear.....
 
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DSRTEGL

Well-known member
#3
For the sake of polite conversation.....Lets look at it this way.......How much would it cost to make similar jigs at home

Eyelets................................,..$2.99/100
Lead.......................................$2.50/pound
Lead Mold...........................$46
Holographic Tape.............$Not Free
Paint Markers.....................$Not Free
Clear Coat...........................$Not Free
Hooks...................................$Not Free
Lure Eyes.............................$Not Free
MY TIME.............................$SERIOUSLY NOT FREE

Now I plan to do a little experimenting today with stuff I just have laying around and we will see what happens.....A LOT of micro jig users are using lead inline sinkers hammered out to make their jigs so I plan to give that a try.

Pics later if the results are not too embarassing
 

Ken Jones

Administrator
Staff member
#4
I'm generally more of a bait angler for perch but when I have tried jigging it's been smaller, 5/8 oz. or so, Kastmasters or Krocodiles. And, I don't care for treble hooks since I release most of the fish I catch. But, for most vertical jigging I think almost any jig will work if it's the right color/size and the person knows how to use it.
 

DSRTEGL

Well-known member
#5
Soooooo......Remember when i said "pics if not too embarassing".......HARD PASS on the hammered out Inline Sinkers.....Total PAIN IN THE ASS and it exposes you to lead particulates........NOT AT ALL LIKE YOU SEE ON YOUTUBE......I don't do trebles for perch either.....I prefer 1 or 2 hook "Assist Hook" rigs......I have made my own spoons OUT OF SPOONS for years and blade baits out of knife blades.......

One a well know Rodbuilding Board....I was known as a "Kitchen Sink" Rodbuilder because I was always trying out of the box things.

I am pretty much the same with my lure building........

I posted the micro jig pics hoping to get input from people how have actually tried them......I see something already made that I can flip into something I can use with minimum effort. Lose the treble hooks and add "assist hooks" and add a good split ring and I am good to go I think.....I prefer the design of the micro jigs in the upper picture.

I make a little money now......But after going through 2 1/2 years of unemployment starting in January 2009, I still don't like SPENDING the money if I can make something from something I have laying around the house.......
 
#7
micro jig fishing is big in areas of asia where the fish are small. Crippled Herring have that flutter action you want. Jigs they use for ice fishing probably also work especially tipped with mussel or crab. Personally I feel soft plastics on a jighead or dropshot rig would work just as well.
 

DSRTEGL

Well-known member
#8
micro jig fishing is big in areas of asia where the fish are small. Crippled Herring have that flutter action you want. Jigs they use for ice fishing probably also work especially tipped with mussel or crab. Personally I feel soft plastics on a jighead or dropshot rig would work just as well.

That I why I am wanting to try the technique here......I have a friend in the navy stationed in Japan and he is KILLING IT micro jigging near structure.....
 

pinfish

Well-known member
#9
guys were doing this at lake kawaguchiko in japan for small fish off their boats two weeks ago i was there.

i've done it with kastmasters. i got mackarel, lizardfish, sand bass and small halibut in the past, in sandy eggo
 
#10
For the sake of polite conversation.....Lets look at it this way.......How much would it cost to make similar jigs at home

Eyelets................................,..$2.99/100
Lead.......................................$2.50/pound
Lead Mold...........................$46
Holographic Tape.............$Not Free
Paint Markers.....................$Not Free
Clear Coat...........................$Not Free
Hooks...................................$Not Free
Lure Eyes.............................$Not Free
MY TIME.............................$SERIOUSLY NOT FREE

Now I plan to do a little experimenting today with stuff I just have laying around and we will see what happens.....A LOT of micro jig users are using lead inline sinkers hammered out to make their jigs so I plan to give that a try.

Pics later if the results are not too embarassing
It's one of the reasons I don't make sabiki flys anymore. It's not cost effective for me. I can buy a set for a buck. I'll also buy cheap $1 jigs from fishing shows for myself and repaint them to what I want. Just match the pattern to the bait the fish are feeding on.
 

Ken Jones

Administrator
Staff member
#11
An individual can rarely if ever match the cost effectiveness of a company producing any product. If you could there would not be a need for the business. Making your own jigs or sinkers or whatever can be fun, and the finished product reflects what you want it to reflect, but the cost issue is another matter.
 
#12
An individual can rarely if ever match the cost effectiveness of a company producing any product. If you could there would not be a need for the business. Making your own jigs or sinkers or whatever can be fun, and the finished product reflects what you want it to reflect, but the cost issue is another matter.
Yea, I remember how fun it was when I was the only person making and using those homemade sabikis. Then people copy and you're just like the rest of the crowd again.

All if not most of my surf "Irons" are kastmasters and krocks, a couple of Hopkins Shortys. Never tried anything newer.

I took a good look at the second pic. Those jigs are familiar. A lot of people use the 1oz and heavier versions for bonito. I actually have a couple in my arsenal. The thing with cheap jigs is that you don't worry about losing them as much when bottom fishing.
 

Ken Jones

Administrator
Staff member
#13
Given the cost of some lures now a days, i.e., $20 or more, "cheap" lures look better and better — if they hold up. Dull hooks or a lure that can literally be broken apart by a fish doesn't cut it.
 

DSRTEGL

Well-known member
#14
Given the cost of some lures now a days, i.e., $20 or more, "cheap" lures look better and better — if they hold up. Dull hooks or a lure that can literally be broken apart by a fish doesn't cut it.
The first thing I usually replace is the split rings and the hooks
 
#15
A few coats of epoxy before using should protect the finish. Durability aside, micro-fishing in Asia is big ... shore angler in U.S. can learn a lot
from Asian techniques. Certainly worth trying. Rockfish, greenling, stripers and halibut readily take jigs. Luckycraft flash minnows work well
for perch in the surf.