Fishing in The Rain.........Not

DSRTEGL

Active member
#1
I remember fishing with Mel (Melluvstofish) back in the day at Paradise Pier in some CRAZY BAD weather.....Out pier carts were being blown all over the place......As I get older......fishing in those conditions has just lost its appeal.......AM I ALONE
 

Ken Jones

Administrator
Staff member
#2
I don't mind fishing in a light rain if the wind isn't kicking up. I can survive the rain but have a hard time with the wind. Of course it also helps to have some appropriate clothing. I remember one Get Together at the Cabrillo Mole in Catalina were we were caught in the rain. Some people had rain clothes and some didn't. Those without were drenched and chilled.
 
#3
Yea don’t mind the rain so much. It’s difficult to fish in the wind. Or wind with a fast current is the worst, with loose pieces of kelp.

I remember I was fishing on Ocean Beach pier and a Japanese man and his kids were there. They brought a portable table that had an umbrella. The wind picked up and the guy had to go keep the thing from flying overboard. He just packed up and left after that.
 
#4
It’s not fun when you get your shoes, pants and hoodie wet when your poncho decides to stop working. I know because a long time ago I was young and dumb enough to try to fish in the rain on Pacifica pier. The pier was empty, and maybe I should have read the signs that it wasn’t going to be a good day.
 
#5
I've had some good bites (perch, spotfin) in the rain. It always feels good when you are freezing your butt off on the pier and when you get on to land a everything feels warm and cozy. Well, to me at least. Head somewhere to get a warm lunch and you're good.
 
#8
I will fish in the rain if the tide is good. Kind of tentative to fish when the water is low and the rocks and seaweed are exposed. Coupled with rain, this makes for dangerous slippery conditions.

I will fish in the wind if it's a seasonal period and the targeted fish are around.

I will fish in the cold.

I'll even fish hungry.

But I will not fish with any three of the above combinations.


I find that as I age, and time and muscles and joints conspire, I am less enthused about embracing inclement weather for fishing. But I'll still go out. Never have caught anything at home. And for those who worry too much about weather or difficulty, this suggestion:

safewayii.jpg

Reasonable hours and you never have to worry about obstacles or challenge. Safe and warm and quite conducive for Internet fishing.
 
#9
pumpedup.jpg dirtybucket.jpg


Sort of a case in point. Today the wind was up, the tide was low, and the air was pretty frigid. Recent experience has shown me that the local fishing prospects are wan no matter the tide, but I still needed to get out. We're between storms and it's a beautiful clear day. This morning's low tide was 2.0 at 9:36 and that, for me, is a perfect time to pump up ghost shrimp. Minus tides I like for foraging pile worms. The 2.0 yields fresher holes and the incoming waves are helpful for suction security. (I think I always wanted to say that!) It's wearisome and frustrating to pump a dry hole, a lot of labor for nothing. The chance of that is greater on a minus tide. So now I have a decent bucket of bait. Not huge ghosties (see 2oz coin sinker for scale) but good enough. I can use them later on when the tide rises, or keep them cool overnight. Most likely I'll freeze them in a 3:1 salt to borax dry mix. They'll stay soft and the scent will be natural. As good as live ones? No. But close. For some reason, striped perch slam the preserved shrimp in the rocky intertidal zones of Monterey and Point Reyes. So do calico perch. It's one bait you can actually target them with. Flounder like them, too. That may be my next quarry...
 

DSRTEGL

Active member
#10
With me is comes down the the fact that my body is aging faster than I might like.....Scoliosis and Nerve Troubles........Joys of getting older......Worst in cold, wet weather......Great job on the ghosties.....If you are ever in the Bodega Bay Area there are some great spots for them......REALLY want to get myself sorted out so I can start fishing the coast again....But they have me working so much OT at work I have trouble getting medical appointments
 

Red Fish

Active member
#13
My feelings exactly:
“i'm like the big stripers: I don't waste my energy unless i know its gonna be good.”

The last two keeper sturgeon I caught were in the rain. But, if you don’t own decent rain gear, tarp, canopy, golf umbrella, you are best off staying home!

Who wants to get sick and miss more days of fishing?! LOL. :sick::p
 
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Ken Jones

Administrator
Staff member
#15
One of my best days fishing off a pier occurred in Biloxi, Mississippi during a driving rain, thunder and lightening storm. Many fish and some nice quality fish Including a channel bass and a large gafftopsail catfish). However, I was under a small shade roof out at the end. I stayed mostly dry and the wind wasn't too bad. A bigger problem, one that anglers later pointed out, might have been the possibility of the lightening deciding to make my fishing rod a point to seek out. I didn’t even consider that danger while fishing. My wife who was watching this take place from the window of our motel thought I was crazy — but she was used to it.
 

Red Fish

Active member
#16
One of my best days fishing off a pier occurred in Biloxi, Mississippi during a driving rain, thunder and lightening storm. Many fish and some nice quality fish Including a channel bass and a large gafftopsail catfish). However, I was under a small shade roof out at the end. I stayed mostly dry and the wind wasn't too bad. A bigger problem, one that anglers later pointed out, might have been the possibility of the lightening deciding to make my fishing rod a point to seek out. I didn’t even consider that danger while fishing. My wife who was watching this take place from the window of our motel thought I was crazy — but she was used to it.
Isn’t that why some people save their wooden rod or wooden golf clubs for such an occasion? With the conductivity of graphite, I imagine you could be “ a goner.”
:unsure:
:eek:
 

Ken Jones

Administrator
Staff member
#17
This was back in 1992 on the Harrison Street Pier in Biloxi and quite honestly I do not even know which rods I was using during that trip. But probably graphite and yes they can be dangerous during a lightening storms. Perhaps a reason why EVERY other angler left the pier.
 

Red Fish

Active member
#18
This was back in 1992 on the Harrison Street Pier in Biloxi and quite honestly I do not even know which rods I was using during that trip. But probably graphite and yes they can be dangerous during a lightening storms. Perhaps a reason why EVERY other angler left the pier.
I was reading (today) that boating under such conditions is the most dangerous because water is such a good conductor of electricity.
 
#19
I was reading (today) that boating under such conditions is the most dangerous because water is such a good conductor of electricity.
There's a youtube video where a guy from I think Florida is on his kayak, hooks up on a huge Tarpon but has to cut it loose because of the aproaching storm. Then he has to book it back to shore.
 
#20
As a kid I used to love fishing in the rain. I would wear my rain gear to stay dry and bring along hot chocolate in a thermos. As I have gotten older I am more of a wimp when it comes to the cold. I don't mind the rain as long as I bring my rain gear to stay dry. Thankfully, my son has that same spirit of adventure. The weather does not matter to him. If I have a day off he wants to fish. We are gonig sturgeon fishing this Monday. We'll see how the weather goes.

Gerry