Crissy field

#2
Been slow there. An occasional Halibut if you really put in the time. Seems they show up more on the way out later in the season from what a couple of the locals told me.
 
#3
I've only seen a few halis pulled in towards the bottom of the tide from Torpedo Wharf and Crissy. Most of the people out there are fishing for halibut right now it looks like. Personally I've had a little more luck throwing dropshots off Torpedo Wharf for rockfish and lings-- nothing big mind you, but getting some action from a few 14-15" lings is better than casting for hali for hours with nothing. This week the tides will bottom out at decent times for some morning fishing, which could be productive.
 
#4
Was there from 1:30 - 4:00PM through the top of the tide and saw a slough of people lining the initial walkway at Torpedo Wharf with their rod-holder-vice-clamp things, all aimed at the shallows running eastward along Crissy. All said they were going for halibut.

Seemed like there was plenty of small jacksmelt in the water as well. A lot of people throwing two hook rigs with a bobber and bringing in a decent amount of fish to be used as live bait for halis. Didn't see one hali hooked however. Plenty of people poaching dungies though. Man that always pisses me off. All I could do was take photos and send them in using CalTIP.

Aside from the jacksmelt catches, I caught 2 undersized lings (12"& 13") off dropshots and as I was walking back to the parking lot I saw someone land what looked like a 20-21" striper from the same shallows as the people soaking for halibut. From around high tide (2:20ish) today until I left at 4 the entire north side of the the pier was swarming with bait that looked like small anchovies. I had hoped to bounce my lures around that to entice something towards a larger meal but no takers today.
 
#6
That is a pier right? How do you land your fish, with net?
I mean, yes it's a pier, but it's only like 10ft or so down to the water, so if your line can handle it you ought to be able to land a lot of things straight onto it. Otherwise yes, a crab net/landing net, or if it's not too crowded you could lead the fish over to shore on either side of the pier. When the tide is out you've got a decent amount of land to work with.
 
#10
I had a small hali on a swimbait last week. I haven't seen any real bait yet though... in past years there was always something jumping out of the water on the shoreline but so far it is quiet. My guess is that the bait will show up once it warms up a bit.
 
#11
Fished 4 hrs this past Sunday for a skunk, got a hit but didn’t get to set the hook as I was waiting for it but it spit out the lure. The water temp was on cold side, didn’t see bait fish at all
 
#13
Tried this morning's incoming at Crissy and got two halis in seven casts. 4lb and 12lb. I've never had it happen that quickly before!

I was using an olive colored swimbait with a #6 trap hook in the tail. I caught both on the trap hook. The trap hook has been very successful for me over the years. The bites were barely noticeable. Just a very light single tap.

IMG_20190528_070641_01.jpg
 
#15
Tried this morning's incoming at Crissy and got two halis in seven casts. 4lb and 12lb. I've never had it happen that quickly before!

I was using an olive colored swimbait with a #6 trap hook in the tail. I caught both on the trap hook. The trap hook has been very successful for me over the years. The bites were barely noticeable. Just a very light single tap.
Nice catches.

Do you have any problems with them swallowing the trap hook? I have read about trap hooks being used for halibut, but I have been hesitant to try it, fearing gut hooking an undersized fish with a treble hook.

Steve
 
#16
Tried this morning's incoming at Crissy and got two halis in seven casts. 4lb and 12lb. I've never had it happen that quickly before!

I was using an olive colored swimbait with a #6 trap hook in the tail. I caught both on the trap hook. The trap hook has been very successful for me over the years. The bites were barely noticeable. Just a very light single tap.
Nicely done! That sure is quick work! You mentioned that the bites were very light. What type of retrieve did the trick for you? And are you using a treble as a trap hook or just a single #6?
 
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#17
I use a single #6 octopus hook. I tie 30lb braid to a #6 octopus hook, and then I use a large sewing needle to thread the braid from the tail to the main hook. I tie the braid to the base of the main hook and then soak it with super glue. I've had really good success doing this with Storm 360GT Searchbait Minnows in the 4.5-inch size. They're a bit more expensive than Big Hammers but they seem to hang up less on seaweed. I think it is the shape of the head.

For both fish, the trap hook was in the lip or jaw. See the closeup below.

For the retrieve, I typically do a slow retrieve making sure I feel the bottom, then a pause and then a twitch. The bites are usually in the pause or just after the twitch. The bites are just a tap. They are almost hard to tell apart from the lure just hitting a rock. But there is usually something different about the bite, it's just a bit sharper. It's hard to describe, but after making a thousand casts, you just know that it is different. I usually wait for a moment and then slowly load up the rod until I feel the weight of the fish.

IMG_20190528_131553.jpg

IMG_20190528_074612.jpg
 
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#20
I use a single #6 octopus hook. I tie 30lb braid to a #6 octopus hook, and then I use a large sewing needle to thread the braid from the tail to the main hook. I tie the braid to the base of the main hook and then soak it with super glue. I've had really good success doing this with Storm 360GT Searchbait Minnows in the 4.5-inch size. They're a bit more expensive than Big Hammers but they seem to hang up less on seaweed. I think it is the shape of the head.

For both fish, the trap hook was in the lip or jaw. See the closeup below.

For the retrieve, I typically do a slow retrieve making sure I feel the bottom, then a pause and then a twitch. The bites are usually in the pause or just after the twitch. The bites are just a tap. They are almost hard to tell apart from the lure just hitting a rock. But there is usually something different about the bite, it's just a bit sharper. It's hard to describe, but after making a thousand casts, you just know that it is different. I usually wait for a moment and then slowly load up the rod until I feel the weight of the fish.
Thanks for the explanation.

Steve