Avalon 11/28

EgoNonBaptizo

Well-known member
#1
I made a last minute decision to hop on the ferry with a friend to do some fishing. We took the earliest ferry (7 am) to the island, and started fishing the GPP, where we would stay for the rest of the day.

Cabrillo Mole Construction:
IMG_6489.jpg

The floating dock at the end was gone, freeing up a substantial amount of space. The end was already crowded, but it didn't appear that anyone else had caught anything, minus one angler who had caught a bonito on a jerkbait. I started off fishing the same, while my friend fished shrimp on a sliding sinker rig. I had several hits and pulled hooks on the jerkbait, while my friend caught a 12" sheephead (released because it was too close) and a decently sized whitefish. After a while, the bonito dispersed, and fishing slowed considerably, with periodic schools of baitfish passing by too quickly to catch. Around noon, disaster struck. I left a light spinning setup on the rail momentarily to help my friend unhook a fish, only for the current to take the rig into the props of the docked semi-submersible, leading the rod to be pulled clear over the railing and into the props, where it was chopped into mincemeat (evidenced by bits of cork and blank floating to the surface). No damage was done to the boat, but that was $250 down the drain. I had no choice but to continue fishing to make the best of the day, but around this time, conditions began to turn around. Large groups of opaleye came out from under the pier and bit on flylined peas with reckless abandon, and I hooked several in rapid succession, landing three due to the pilings. Fishing then slowed again until about 2:30, when the opaleye began biting again, and I was able to catch some more, while my friend managed two and a 13" sheephead, only falling short of a one-person limit of opaleye again due to the pilings. Around 4, I saw a baitfish skimming the water's surface, and I tied on a splasher out of boredom. On the first cast, a bonito jumped on.

Harbor Bonito:
IMG_6490.jpg

This action continued until around 5, I landed five (15"-18"), with multiple near-misses and lost fish, and my friend got one. Afterwards, action slowed, with only a few small sheephead and calico in the mix until we took the 6:30 boat home.

Combined haul:
IMG_6497.jpg
 
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Stickman

Well-known member
#3
Great report, Ego! Love the "arm's length" Bonito pic. I have ruined a few rods over the years out of sheer stupidity (like closing the car door before confirming that all of the rods were actually INSIDE the car!!) but the way your rod took itself out was an end befitting a James Bond villain. You get 100 extra points for style!
 

evanluck

Well-known member
#4
Legendary Day! I agree with Stickman, if you are going to lose a rod, that was an epic way to do it.

Those are some of the biggest Opal eye I have ever seen! Catching those on peas has to be one of the best bait to fish ratio ever, other than catching a huge carp on a piece of corn.

What a great day of fishing! Awesome job!

Too bad about your rod and reel. I think if you actually got that on video. The viral Youtube revenue would have paid for the setup 10x over.

Thanks for the report!
 
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#7
Just a note: Don’t want to rain on anybodies parade but those Opaleye siwim around Avalon Harbor feeding on toilet flushing which are all to common in the Harbor. I have dove the Harbor many times on “product retrieval. Mostly fishing equipment, watches and tools. Even the Bass and Halibut in the Harbor take part in the free chum. Just some facts to ponder but I think that the home guard fish that live in in Avalon Harbor and the Ithmus should be catch and release. Good news is the Bonito are probably fine as are the Barracuda and Yellowtail. Good luck out there.
 

EgoNonBaptizo

Well-known member
#8
I’ve heard about the issue of opaleye and other harbor fish feeding on human waste. This seems most apparent during the summer, judging by their stomach contents and even external smell, but during the fall and winter, their diets seem to shift back to natural food like algae and invertebrates as boat traffic decreases. If the Mole was open I’d much rather take fish from there, but the wintertime harbor fish is just about the best I can get until the Mole opens up.
 

evanluck

Well-known member
#9
It's interesting to me the ebb and flow of such a long day. You basically had 3-4 hot times. I don't think I've ever had such a long session on the shore. Wondering if the slow days I experience are just me being there at the wrong time. Would be great to more reliably target the hotter times when I am schedule constrained for fishing.

I using the fishing calendar app which has a great interface communicating what it thinks the hot times will be but it seems to me that it's prediction ability is hit or miss. Although I only started using it when the weather cooled and I've have yet to have a good session when it said the fishing was going to be poor. Only poor sessions when it said the fishing would be good/excellent. Maybe I just need to become a better angler!


I made a last minute decision to hop on the ferry with a friend to do some fishing. We took the earliest ferry (7 am) to the island, and started fishing the GPP, where we would stay for the rest of the day.

Cabrillo Mole Construction:
View attachment 1763

The floating dock at the end was gone, freeing up a substantial amount of space. The end was already crowded, but it didn't appear that anyone else had caught anything, minus one angler who had caught a bonito on a jerkbait. I started off fishing the same, while my friend fished shrimp on a sliding sinker rig. I had several hits and pulled hooks on the jerkbait, while my friend caught a 12" sheephead (released because it was too close) and a decently sized whitefish. After a while, the bonito dispersed, and fishing slowed considerably, with periodic schools of baitfish passing by too quickly to catch. Around noon, disaster struck. I left a light spinning setup on the rail momentarily to help my friend unhook a fish, only for the current to take the rig into the props of the docked semi-submersible, leading the rod to be pulled clear over the railing and into the props, where it was chopped into mincemeat (evidenced by bits of cork and blank floating to the surface). No damage was done to the boat, but that was $250 down the drain. I had no choice but to continue fishing to make the best of the day, but around this time, conditions began to turn around. Large groups of opaleye came out from under the pier and bit on flylined peas with reckless abandon, and I hooked several in rapid succession, landing three due to the pilings. Fishing then slowed again until about 2:30, when the opaleye began biting again, and I was able to catch some more, while my friend managed two and a 13" sheephead, only falling short of a one-person limit of opaleye again due to the pilings. Around 4, I saw a baitfish skimming the water's surface, and I tied on a splasher out of boredom. On the first cast, a bonito jumped on.

Harbor Bonito:
View attachment 1761

This action continued until around 5, I landed five (15"-18"), with multiple near-misses and lost fish, and my friend got one. Afterwards, action slowed, with only a few small sheephead and calico in the mix until we took the 6:30 boat home.

Combined haul:
View attachment 1762
 

Mahigeer

Well-known member
#10
Just a note: Don’t want to rain on anybodies parade but those Opaleye siwim around Avalon Harbor feeding on toilet flushing which are all to common in the Harbor. I have dove the Harbor many times on “product retrieval. Mostly fishing equipment, watches and tools. Even the Bass and Halibut in the Harbor take part in the free chum. Just some facts to ponder but I think that the home guard fish that live in in Avalon Harbor and the Ithmus should be catch and release. Good news is the Bonito are probably fine as are the Barracuda and Yellowtail. Good luck out there.

For a long time, Heal the Bay used to give Avalon low grades when it comes to water quality. However, if memory serves, in recent years the rating has been much better and I would say much improved.

Although it is a guess on my part, but I doubt that the sewer is put in the bay. The beach would not be open for swimmers.

I would not eat any Halfmoon (Catalina blue perch). They are cleaner of other fish, especially sunfish. I even heard that they have smell when filleted.
 

Makairaa

Well-known member
#11
For a long time, Heal the Bay used to give Avalon low grades when it comes to water quality. However, if memory serves, in recent years the rating has been much better and I would say much improved.

Although it is a guess on my part, but I doubt that the sewer is put in the bay. The beach would not be open for swimmers.

I would not eat any Halfmoon (Catalina blue perch). They are cleaner of other fish, especially sunfish. I even heard that they have smell when filleted.
There is still plenty of run off when it rains though. The harbor patrol started dropping die tablets in non porta potty toilets of boats renting moorings to show if boats are dumping their toilets or holding tanks overboard. It has really helped the pollution levels.
 

evanluck

Well-known member
#13
I’ve heard about the issue of opaleye and other harbor fish feeding on human waste. This seems most apparent during the summer, judging by their stomach contents and even external smell, but during the fall and winter, their diets seem to shift back to natural food like algae and invertebrates as boat traffic decreases. If the Mole was open I’d much rather take fish from there, but the wintertime harbor fish is just about the best I can get until the Mole opens up.
When does the Mole open up?