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>> Pickled Herring [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 4:56 pm
SurfFisher08


Posts: 1264

Hey Crew,

Do you need to de-bone your herring before you pickle them prior to eating? I've heard that the rib bones will dissolve in the vinegar/salt brine. I don't want to go all into this pickled herring recipe and then have them all bony. Thanks.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 5:31 pm
FishermanDan


Posts: 2495

Deep fry! Or slap em on the Grill, Mmmm.. wait a minute, what Herring? Every time I looked your net was coming up empty! Wink

BTW, I have no idea on the pickling. Heard thats the way to go, along with smoked.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 7:43 pm
SurfFisher08


Posts: 1264

Dan, if you don't have an answer then don't try to give me one. If I had all day everyday to fish, then I wouldn't be half bad at it either.


Burned X 10
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:13 am
thefrood


Posts: 1293
Location: Southern California (Riverside County)

Monkeyface News has a recipe for what Kirk does with his herring... gotta look through the archives on it to find it though. Don't recall if he mentioned anything about the bones...
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:18 pm
t177


Posts: 269

Eric, how did it come out?

Speaking of de-boning fish prior to the pickling process, the pickled mackerel (shime saba in Japanese) is made of de-boned filet of mackerel, although I don't know anything about pickled herring. haha
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2009 12:08 am
SurfFisher08


Posts: 1264

Well, I had about 20 or more pounds of herring of all sizes. I cleaned about half of them and the other half went to bait. I split the cleaned ones into 4 bags and sorted them by size. I figured the small ones would be good for pickling and the larger ones better for smoking, grilling, and frying. Last night I went to BevMo and got some of my favorite brews (I'm a huge samuel smith's fan). I filleted 6 of the large ones a fried them up in a cornmeal/flour batter and they were pretty good. They are STRONG though and salting them prior to cooking didn't remove the strong fish taste but I loved it and it tasted great with beer. Definitely not a fish for rookies.
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2009 2:47 am
FishermanDan


Posts: 2495

I hear the roe is real popular(and expensive) in Europe. Guess it makes a nice spread, who knew?
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 10:42 pm
t177


Posts: 269

SurfFisher08 wrote:
Well, I had about 20 or more pounds of herring of all sizes. I cleaned about half of them and the other half went to bait. I split the cleaned ones into 4 bags and sorted them by size. I figured the small ones would be good for pickling and the larger ones better for smoking, grilling, and frying. Last night I went to BevMo and got some of my favorite brews (I'm a huge samuel smith's fan). I filleted 6 of the large ones a fried them up in a cornmeal/flour batter and they were pretty good. They are STRONG though and salting them prior to cooking didn't remove the strong fish taste but I loved it and it tasted great with beer. Definitely not a fish for rookies.


Next time, try with grated daikon with some lemon/lime juice and soy sauce. The daikon softens the fishy-ness a little bit. Also, grilling them would get rid of fishy oil rather than adding them by frying them though. Were there any eggs? Those eggs are good!
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 10:45 pm
t177


Posts: 269

FishermanDan wrote:
I hear the roe is real popular(and expensive) in Europe. Guess it makes a nice spread, who knew?


They're popular in Japan as well. I love how crunchy they are.
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 25, 2009 3:55 pm
bipnilaga


Posts: 377
Location: eastbay

When you fry them, put a large chunk of smashed ginger in the hot oil, kills the fishy smell and taste.

Also if you like your fish crispy and light without a heavy batter do the following:

1) season freshly dressed fish with salt and pepper
2) coat in a little bit of olive oil
3) put in a large ziplock freezer bag
4) Add powered garlic, paprika
6) Add a couple teaspoons of cornstarch
7) shake!
Cool remove from bag and place on plate
9) let sit in fridge for 10mins

You end up with a light crust. When you fry it up it is flakey and browns nice.

Works for whole fish or fish pieces.

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