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>> Reports & Pictures from the Pine Avenue Pier, 1905-1934 [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Wed Sep 06, 2017 7:35 pm
Ken Jones


Posts: 9461
Location: California

http://kenjonesfishing.com/2017/09/pine-avenue-pier-long-beach-1905-1934/
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 6:46 pm
mav


Posts: 194

I enjoy seeeing old piers and their designs. I often would think on how I'd design a fishing pier. This is very close to what I'd have in mind. Double deck to keep the pedestrians and fishermen separate. I know conflicts occur between the two, usually leaving the fishermen with the short end of the stick. I'll skip the rant. Cool article though. Funny thing is that when I was a kid, I'd often dream about piers that don't even exist.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 7:31 pm
uglystick


Posts: 61

I have been wondering why there seems to be no new pier to be built.

Why did people decide to build (many) piers then but not now?

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2017 1:49 pm
sea_forager


Posts: 210
Location: San Francisco

uglystick wrote:
I have been wondering why there seems to be no new pier to be built.

Why did people decide to build (many) piers then but not now?



My understanding-- and people here will correct me if I'm wrong-- is that many of the piers here in California were initially built as practical infrastructure e.g. stations for ships loading/unloading people and cargo when train travel was not so common, or "pleasure piers" built as grounds for entertainment (games, rides, etc..).

I haven't done much digging into the subject, but I don't know how many public piers in California were specifically built for allowing angling access.

As for why no new piers, cost is probably the major factor I'd imagine. The weather takes a toll on these structures and upkeep is expensive. In California I bet environmental impact presents barriers to building them as well.

Would Ken or anyone else like to chime in?

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2017 8:45 pm
mav


Posts: 194

I agree with cost as a factor. Need to build them with solar pannels.

Yea,I believe Impearial Beach pier was originally built for wave power or a wave power experiment. I've read some of the other piers up the coast were stops for logging as shipments of logs were floated down the coast.
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 3:30 pm
Ken Jones


Posts: 9461
Location: California

Fifty of California's public piers were built or renovated (at least in part) by money from the Wildlife Conservation Board. New piers built after 1959 were built as fishing piers.

Several piers were renovated from a previous life as bridges, i.e., the older Vallejo Pier, the Dumbarton Pier, the F.D. Roosevelt Pier, the San Mateo Bridge Pier, the Antioch Bridge Pier, and the Ravenswood Pier. When new bridges were built, the older, closer to the water bridges were converted (in Part) to fishing piers.

The Berkeley Pier was onetime used by cars to reach the Berkeley ferry to San Francisco. It was used for many years after the ferry closed as a fishing pier and then finally, in 1959, was the first pier to be renovated by the Wildlife Conservation Board.

The Ferry Point Pier in Richmond was also a landing at one time, it was the landing for the Richmond-San Francisco ferry and part of the old works still survive.

The Santa Cruz Wharf has always been a multi-purpose pier that allowed angling which is the same as Wharf #2 in Monterey.

Several piers that were designed and exist today as fishing piers once saw previous wharves or piers in the same location that were commercial wharves (although they allowed fishing). Newport, Redondo Beach, Malibu, Port San Luis, Avila, Cayucos, and Point Arena are examples of such piers.

Some piers that were built as fishing (or pleasure) piers also served as structures under which sewage pipes could be attached. Pacifica and Santa Monica are examples of such piers.

Several early piers including the original Imperial Beach Piers and the Manhattan Beach Pier had wave motor machines installed on the pier to provide electricity to service beach side needs for electricity. The piers were not built for the wave motor machines but served as dual purpose places for the machines. Separate "wave motor" piers were built in Huntington Beach and at Redondo but didn't survive too many years before being destroyed by storms.

The piers have a rich history that continues to be written, sometimes for the good and sometimes for the bad.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 3:39 am
mav


Posts: 194

Thanks ken. Its some very interesting stuff.
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