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>> Pacific Hake [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2016 3:54 pm
Ken Jones


Posts: 9415
Location: California

http://kenjonesfishing.com/2016/10/pacific-hake/
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2016 4:12 pm
Ken Jones


Posts: 9415
Location: California

I probably should have asked if anyone on here has caught a hake at a pier? As mentioned in the article, when I fished the Newport Pier on a regular basis I caught quite a few hake.
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2016 11:36 am
CatchinKelp


Posts: 877
Location: Santa Barbara County

I have not but been hoping to catch one for the novelty. A related matter: I bought a 5 pound bag of frozen hake fillets earlier this year to make fish for dinner. My girlfriend and I thawed them in cold water, then pan-fried them in garlic butter and capers, but the first bite it turned out to be very mushy and almost not like meat at all, more like a fish paste. Just as you said in your blog, we ended up with bad hake. I continued to try to eat mine but my girlfriend dumped hers in the trash. I was very disappointed with it. If I catch some myself, I will have to gut and ice them down immediately. Any other tips on how to care for it after capture?
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2016 12:32 pm
taylor31


Posts: 43

We used to catch quite a few from tha Pacifica Pier in the 90s when I was a kid, they would regularly be mixed in with the white croakers. We called the hake Tomcod and the croakers Kingfish. Now I here a bunch of people down here call croakers Tomcod.
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2016 5:26 pm
Ken Jones


Posts: 9415
Location: California

How big were the fish? When I fished the Pacifica Pier regularly back in the 70s I used to catch a lot of small Pacific tomcod although I never caught a hake. They are very similar in general body shape.

Pacific Tomcod

Species:
Microgadus proximus (Girard, 1854); from the Greek words micros (small) and gadus (codfish), and the Latin word proximus (next).

Alternate Names:
Tomcod, piciata and wachna.

Identification: Typical cod-like shape with three dorsal fins and two anal fins. Tomcod have a short chin barbel. Their coloring is usually brownish above (although some are olive colored), and white below.
Size: To 12 inches; most caught off piers are 9-10 inches long.

Range: From Point Sal, California, to Unalaska Island, Alaska.

Habitat: Prefers a sandy, near-shore environment, although caught out to 700-foot depths.

Piers: Pacific tomcod are common to almost all piers north of Monterey Bay. Best bets: Pillar Point Harbor Pier, Pacifica Pier, San Francisco Municipal Pier, Fort Baker Pier, Point Arena Pier, Eureka Municipal Wharf, Trinidad Pier and the B Street Pier in Crescent City.

Shoreline: Rarely seen by inshore anglers in California; common farther north.

Boats: An inshore species rarely seen by boat fishermen in California.

Bait and Tackle: When schools of tomcod move in, anglers can expect fast and furious action. The best bait appears to be pile worms, a small strip of anchovy, or a small strip of squid. Hooks should be small, size 6 or 8, and the best technique is to cast out, allow the bait to sink, and begin to retrieve as soon as the bait hits bottom. The tomcod usually will hit the bait mid-depth as it is being pulled up.

Food Value:
Most tomcod are really too small for eating although some people like to pan-fry them as they would any small fish.

Comments:
Fun to catch on light tackle and they provide a major source of fun for children angling in northern areas. Not to be confused with white croaker that are generally called tomcod in southern California and kingfish in northern California..

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PostPosted: Mon Oct 24, 2016 9:15 pm
taylor31


Posts: 43

Looks like you're right they were Tomcod.
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 25, 2016 1:25 pm
Ken Jones


Posts: 9415
Location: California

CatchinKelp wrote:
I have not but been hoping to catch one for the novelty. A related matter: I bought a 5 pound bag of frozen hake fillets earlier this year to make fish for dinner. My girlfriend and I thawed them in cold water, then pan-fried them in garlic butter and capers, but the first bite it turned out to be very mushy and almost not like meat at all, more like a fish paste. Just as you said in your blog, we ended up with bad hake. I continued to try to eat mine but my girlfriend dumped hers in the trash. I was very disappointed with it. If I catch some myself, I will have to gut and ice them down immediately. Any other tips on how to care for it after capture?


The only tips I've ever heard was to ice them as soon as possible. I carry a small cooler in which I keep my bait and I also always carry a number of Ziplock bags. Depending upon the fish, I will sometimes fillet it out soon after capture and put it on the ice in my bait cooler. Supposedly most hake that are sold commercially have been quick frozen. One problem though, as with many fish, is that a number of different species are given different names, i.e., hake, so you sometimes don't know what you are actually getting. I would never buy a whole, unfrozen hake in a fish market since it probably would not be any better than the fish you tried to eat.

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