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>> Rockfish bones stock, rockfish liver? [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2014 8:07 pm
Lucas


Posts: 26

Hey, does anyone make stock out of rock fish bones? I cook my fish whole. I prepare my fish Ike jime. Put a spike into its brain, cut the bottom of the gills to bleed it, and then put a wire through its spine and move it up and down until the fish stops moving. When I get ready to cook it I gut and gill, and then in the cavity near the vent pull out the kidneys along the spine. Then bake it.

I am wondering if anyone makes stock out of rockfish bones? Seems it would make an excellent stock. Anyone eat rockfish liver? I caught a few rockfish whose gonads were full of milt and I boiled that, delicious. If you find a white sack in your rockfish, keep it and Cook it! Thanks
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2014 8:16 pm
Sofa King


Posts: 1707
Location: Danville Ca.

you need to meet MsCMSchultz. she loves that kind of grub.
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 12, 2014 1:09 am
seabass_seeker


Posts: 1839
Location: Clovis

I tried to prepare rockfish liver like ankimo, monkfish liver, once. It's noticeably stronger tasting. I'd be willing to try it prepped differently next time. And yes fish milt is not bad, I like to dust mine in a little starch then fry. Makes a good beer snack.
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 13, 2014 6:12 pm
trepverter


Posts: 180
Location: San Francisco

I always make stock from my limit of rockies. Not as good as halibut bones, but works great
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 15, 2014 11:01 pm
Lucas


Posts: 26

Thanks everyone. Do you make your stock with just the bones or does it still have some meat on after filleting? After I cook my fish whole there's no more meat on the bones. How do you make the stock? Thanks!
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 12:51 pm
MsCMSchultz


Posts: 1287
Location: BUIDB: "Thats a great shot of a pier from the beach."

To[b] get you started on cod "tongues," or any fish "tongues":

http://nutsvilleinnorway.wordpress.com/2012/02/11/cod-tongue-a-norwegian-delicacy/

Note that it's not really the tongues, but if you feel under your jawbone and under your chin, that's what is being harvested. The above link has links to a video showing you how it's done; there are other vidoes to show you how and where to make three quick cuts with the knife to trim them out. I have been experimenting with the fish tongues; we have had them battered and pan-fried. I am saving a bunch for a meal and will try them breaded and pan-fried with bacon--cuz bacon makes everything better.


For the milt:

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/12/steamed-fried-cod-milt-kiku-shirako-tachi-recipes.html

Some people pan fry the breaded or dusted milt and eat on toast. You can also broil them.

Apparently you can make it part of your dining experience in SF, http://www.7x7.com/eat-drink/rare-pleasure-cod-semen-san-francisco



As far as the fish liver:

http://www.russianfoods.com/en/cod-liver-salad/

http://www.grouprecipes.com/34787/cod-liver-salad.html

http://russianmartini.wordpress.com/2013/07/24/cod-liver-salad-%D0%BF%D0%B5%D1%87%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%8C-%D1%82%D1%80%D0%B5%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B8/

I made several versions of fish liver salad and didn't much care for any of them.

I also steamed it monkfish style ala Seabass Seeker, and it wasn't to my taste. Added it to a sinigang (Filipino style soup) and still wasn't to my taste.

Breaded and pan fried the livers and that was marginally acceptable. One day, I broiled the heck out all sides of the liver--and cremated, was better than all the other recipes.

As for the fish stock:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/01/the-nasty-bits-fish-head-soup.html

Here is what I have been doing of late to make a really tasty fish stock:

Source your fish heads and/or frames.

If you have a large stainless steel pot with steamer, that works best. Put your water in the pot, enough so that it doesn't come up to the steamer and bring it to a soft boil. Put your heads and/or carcasses in the steamer, reduce heat to an active simmer. Let simmer until the heads collapse (I make sure the heads no longer ooze anything slimy; yes, I know lots of you are gagging by now--I did too, but I finally got over it.)

As the frames and heads get done, remove till cool enough to handle. If you have lots of heads and frames, keep replacing cooked fish with the uncooked.

The reason I like to steam is to save the trouble of straining bones, etc. and if you keep adding to the steamer, your broth will be outstanding, have body and won't be all "messy."

Pick off all the meat from the bones and heads--it should be cooked perfectly. (Reward yourself with a couple of the cheeks.)

Taste the broth in the pot, add water if needed (depending how many heads and frames you steamed), add your other chosen ingredients and seasonings (altho shouldn't need a whole lot of spices) and the picked meat, along with whatever parts of the heads your palate will allow. (We are still working towards eyeballs, lips and the palate.)

I am getting closer to actually simmering and serving the whole fish head to hubby and me. We actually ate our first roasted fish head two weeks ago--and we liked it.

I read your query again: it helps to leave some meat on the bones, as in the heads and frames. If you don't want to steam, just put your bones, etc. in the pot and add water to cover and bring to a soft boil, then simmer. You will have to strain the broth and remove the bones. The meat floats off the bones, but the flavor will be enriched.

Hope this helps.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 1:15 pm
MsCMSchultz


Posts: 1287
Location: BUIDB: "Thats a great shot of a pier from the beach."

Oh, and let's not forget "fisharrones;"

http://honest-food.net/2013/10/21/fish-skin-chicharrons-recipe/

Altho he recommends parboiling the skins, I couldn't be bothered. I also use fish skins that don't need to be scaled, b/c I am too lazy.

I just make sure the skins, fins, and/or tails are absolutely dry--you don't want the oil to boil over, pop, explode and other kinds of nasty, messy reactions from water hitting hot oil. I roll mine up in paper towels and newspaper and let it sit in fridge overnite.

Take them out to get to room temp while your 3-4" of cooking oil gets to 350-375 degrees--no more and no less.

Cut the skins into manageable pieces with scissors, leave the fins and tails whole. (Skin with pieces of the flesh still attached are VERY good this way--but I wouldn't know b/c by the time I get to eating any, hubby has eaten all those up!)

Slip CAREFULLY into the hot fat; hopefully the surface of skins will bubble up; turn occasionally and drain on paper towels.

Add salt and nibble on throughout the day.

Or, you can store in fridge and add as a garnish to fish soups, noodle soups, or congees. (They will have lost the crispiness.)

(and you can add raw fish skin directly to your stock and serve as part of the soup--it will soften and add texture to your stock.)

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Artist, GretchDragon
TY, Gretch!
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 9:57 pm
Sofa King


Posts: 1707
Location: Danville Ca.

MsCMSchultz wrote:
To[b] get you started on cod "tongues," or any fish "tongues":

http://nutsvilleinnorway.wordpress.com/2012/02/11/cod-tongue-a-norwegian-delicacy/

Note that it's not really the tongues, but if you feel under your jawbone and under your chin, that's what is being harvested. The above link has links to a video showing you how it's done; there are other vidoes to show you how and where to make three quick cuts with the knife to trim them out. I have been experimenting with the fish tongues; we have had them battered and pan-fried. I am saving a bunch for a meal and will try them breaded and pan-fried with bacon--cuz bacon makes everything better.


For the milt:

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/12/steamed-fried-cod-milt-kiku-shirako-tachi-recipes.html

Some people pan fry the breaded or dusted milt and eat on toast. You can also broil them.

Apparently you can make it part of your dining experience in SF, http://www.7x7.com/eat-drink/rare-pleasure-cod-semen-san-francisco



As far as the fish liver:

http://www.russianfoods.com/en/cod-liver-salad/

http://www.grouprecipes.com/34787/cod-liver-salad.html

http://russianmartini.wordpress.com/2013/07/24/cod-liver-salad-%D0%BF%D0%B5%D1%87%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%8C-%D1%82%D1%80%D0%B5%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B8/

I made several versions of fish liver salad and didn't much care for any of them.

I also steamed it monkfish style ala Seabass Seeker, and it wasn't to my taste. Added it to a sinigang (Filipino style soup) and still wasn't to my taste.

Breaded and pan fried the livers and that was marginally acceptable. One day, I broiled the heck out all sides of the liver--and cremated, was better than all the other recipes.

As for the fish stock:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/01/the-nasty-bits-fish-head-soup.html

Here is what I have been doing of late to make a really tasty fish stock:

Source your fish heads and/or frames.

If you have a large stainless steel pot with steamer, that works best. Put your water in the pot, enough so that it doesn't come up to the steamer and bring it to a soft boil. Put your heads and/or carcasses in the steamer, reduce heat to an active simmer. Let simmer until the heads collapse (I make sure the heads no longer ooze anything slimy; yes, I know lots of you are gagging by now--I did too, but I finally got over it.)

As the frames and heads get done, remove till cool enough to handle. If you have lots of heads and frames, keep replacing cooked fish with the uncooked.

The reason I like to steam is to save the trouble of straining bones, etc. and if you keep adding to the steamer, your broth will be outstanding, have body and won't be all "messy."

Pick off all the meat from the bones and heads--it should be cooked perfectly. (Reward yourself with a couple of the cheeks.)

Taste the broth in the pot, add water if needed (depending how many heads and frames you steamed), add your other chosen ingredients and seasonings (altho shouldn't need a whole lot of spices) and the picked meat, along with whatever parts of the heads your palate will allow. (We are still working towards eyeballs, lips and the palate.)

I am getting closer to actually simmering and serving the whole fish head to hubby and me. We actually ate our first roasted fish head two weeks ago--and we liked it.

I read your query again: it helps to leave some meat on the bones, as in the heads and frames. If you don't want to steam, just put your bones, etc. in the pot and add water to cover and bring to a soft boil, then simmer. You will have to strain the broth and remove the bones. The meat floats off the bones, but the flavor will be enriched.

Hope this helps.


What a fantastic write up. Thanks.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 16, 2014 9:58 pm
Sofa King


Posts: 1707
Location: Danville Ca.

MsCMSchultz wrote:
Oh, and let's not forget "fisharrones;"

http://honest-food.net/2013/10/21/fish-skin-chicharrons-recipe/

Altho he recommends parboiling the skins, I couldn't be bothered. I also use fish skins that don't need to be scaled, b/c I am too lazy.

I just make sure the skins, fins, and/or tails are absolutely dry--you don't want the oil to boil over, pop, explode and other kinds of nasty, messy reactions from water hitting hot oil. I roll mine up in paper towels and newspaper and let it sit in fridge overnite.

Take them out to get to room temp while your 3-4" of cooking oil gets to 350-375 degrees--no more and no less.

Cut the skins into manageable pieces with scissors, leave the fins and tails whole. (Skin with pieces of the flesh still attached are VERY good this way--but I wouldn't know b/c by the time I get to eating any, hubby has eaten all those up!)

Slip CAREFULLY into the hot fat; hopefully the surface of skins will bubble up; turn occasionally and drain on paper towels.

Add salt and nibble on throughout the day.

Or, you can store in fridge and add as a garnish to fish soups, noodle soups, or congees. (They will have lost the crispiness.)

(and you can add raw fish skin directly to your stock and serve as part of the soup--it will soften and add texture to your stock.)


This one as well. Heck almost made me wanna try this one...

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