pierfishing.com :: FAQ :: search :: memberlist :: album
  Sign-up as new user :: log in



Sign-up as new user | I forgot my password

Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
PFIC Message Boards >> Rod and Reel Advice/Seminars Reply to this topic
>> Conventional Reel For Dummies? [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2012 11:32 am
branrx


Posts: 85
Location: Morro Bay

Great Forum guys. Appreciate the info. Although I do see even you pros get the birdnest here and there, lol.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2012 12:49 pm
bipnilaga


Posts: 377
Location: eastbay

It also helps to rotate the reel as you cast as well. During the completion of your cast your reel should be facing sideways (left it right depending upon which hand I cast with)
_________________
Fishing, wingchun, pho, and motorcycles...love it.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 12:10 am
CRASS


Posts: 2221
Location: Pacifica, CA

Theres always the Shakespeare E-Z Cast baitcaster.
pretty cheap reel ($35) with an anti-backlash feature you can back off or turn off as you learn.

_________________

كافر
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 2:18 pm
COpierrat


Posts: 42
Location: Denver, CO.

I was always told to adjust the spool tension to the weight you are throwing you want to hold you pole up at a 45 in front of you with your line rigged and baited and then adjust the tension so the lure will fall from rod tip to ground no quicker than 3 seconds to start out. That gives you enough tension to control backlash and not so much that you really harm your distance. As was said before as you get more confident you can back the tension off but you will still need to moderate the spool using your thumb a little. Also the thing that hurt me the most while learning is that with a spinning reel you learn to " snap" your cast out hard and fast. This will completely screw you with the baitcaster. Long smooth stroke with a perfect release point will result in the best cast. Hope this helps. I too am in the process of learning and often think I may be better off going back to spin gear.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 3:28 pm
branrx


Posts: 85
Location: Morro Bay

COpierrat wrote:
I was always told to adjust the spool tension to the weight you are throwing you want to hold you pole up at a 45 in front of you with your line rigged and baited and then adjust the tension so the lure will fall from rod tip to ground no quicker than 3 seconds to start out. That gives you enough tension to control backlash and not so much that you really harm your distance. As was said before as you get more confident you can back the tension off but you will still need to moderate the spool using your thumb a little. Also the thing that hurt me the most while learning is that with a spinning reel you learn to " snap" your cast out hard and fast. This will completely screw you with the baitcaster. Long smooth stroke with a perfect release point will result in the best cast. Hope this helps. I too am in the process of learning and often think I may be better off going back to spin gear.


You hit the point with the 'snap'!! Last night I went out and practiced and realized it was the swing that was doing it. Im using to whipping the rod, a habit with smaller freshwater casting with the spinning real. I finally started getting somewhere by using a smooth yet strong stroke. I think part of what was happening was the weight was out of sink with my cast making it fly wildly and not a a constant speed if that makes sense. At any rate I had much better luck last night.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 4:43 pm
Mahigeer


Posts: 6367

I would also recommend to practice during the day at first.

That way you can see the rig hitting the water, so you can stop the rotation.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Wed Jun 20, 2012 11:54 pm
COpierrat


Posts: 42
Location: Denver, CO.

branrx wrote:
COpierrat wrote:
I was always told to adjust the spool tension to the weight you are throwing you want to hold you pole up at a 45 in front of you with your line rigged and baited and then adjust the tension so the lure will fall from rod tip to ground no quicker than 3 seconds to start out. That gives you enough tension to control backlash and not so much that you really harm your distance. As was said before as you get more confident you can back the tension off but you will still need to moderate the spool using your thumb a little. Also the thing that hurt me the most while learning is that with a spinning reel you learn to " snap" your cast out hard and fast. This will completely screw you with the baitcaster. Long smooth stroke with a perfect release point will result in the best cast. Hope this helps. I too am in the process of learning and often think I may be better off going back to spin gear.


You hit the point with the 'snap'!! Last night I went out and practiced and realized it was the swing that was doing it. Im using to whipping the rod, a habit with smaller freshwater casting with the spinning real. I finally started getting somewhere by using a smooth yet strong stroke. I think part of what was happening was the weight was out of sink with my cast making it fly wildly and not a a constant speed if that makes sense. At any rate I had much better luck last night.


Same thing with me.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 12:01 pm
branrx


Posts: 85
Location: Morro Bay

One more quest, does braid back lash easier than mono or flourocarbon? I have braid on both conventionals I have, and it seems do too its thread like nature it would be most likely to birdnest. BTW, I casting much better now.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 9:25 pm
Mahigeer


Posts: 6367

Braid can be a much tighter wrapped in the backlash.


A pick like this one works great by reaching inside of the knot and loosen it.


http://www.basspro.com/Bass-Pro-Shops-Baitcast-Pic/product/13376/46316


Having to deal with backlash is part of the "cost" of using conventional or bait casting reels.


That is why I have never seen Skipper Jones use one when I fished with him.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2012 11:00 pm
branrx


Posts: 85
Location: Morro Bay

Mahigeer wrote:



Having to deal with backlash is part of the "cost" of using conventional or bait casting reels.


That is why I have never seen Skipper Jones use one when I fished with him.


I tell you what, catching something big is much different with the Penn conventional I have as opposed to the cheap spinning reel I use. Landed a shark a couple nights back barely fealt like anything was on the line with the Penn. Had it been my other reel would have fealt like a whale.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 3:55 pm
csmerril


Posts: 688
Location: Central Coast

branrx wrote:
Mahigeer wrote:



Having to deal with backlash is part of the "cost" of using conventional or bait casting reels.


That is why I have never seen Skipper Jones use one when I fished with him.


I tell you what, catching something big is much different with the Penn conventional I have as opposed to the cheap spinning reel I use. Landed a shark a couple nights back barely fealt like anything was on the line with the Penn. Had it been my other reel would have fealt like a whale.


DUDE that is the best part!!! Unless its a ray. Get one of those, and im done for the night LOL
Top of page
Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 4:08 pm
mel


Posts: 2349

Don't forget to get you one of these. It's a knitting needle and it helps to get the loops out of your backlash. You can get them at any store that sells sewing supplies.



(Or steal one from your wife.)
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 5:13 pm
MsCMSchultz


Posts: 1287
Location: BUIDB: "Thats a great shot of a pier from the beach."

mel wrote:
Don't forget to get you one of these. It's a knitting needle and it helps to get the loops out of your backlash. You can get them at any store that sells sewing supplies.



(Or steal one from your wife.)


That would be a crochet hook, not a knitting needle. And I would think it would also help with knots, mesh, etc, so thanks for bringing that idea up, Mel.

_________________
My Absolutely Adorable @$$!



Artist, GretchDragon
TY, Gretch!
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 6:01 pm
mel


Posts: 2349

MsCMSchultz wrote:
mel wrote:
Don't forget to get you one of these. It's a knitting needle and it helps to get the loops out of your backlash. You can get them at any store that sells sewing supplies.



(Or steal one from your wife.)


That would be a crochet hook, not a knitting needle. And I would think it would also help with knots, mesh, etc, so thanks for bringing that idea up, Mel.


Oops. Thanks for pointing that out, haha.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2012 6:30 pm
COpierrat


Posts: 42
Location: Denver, CO.

RobF wrote:
Funny that you bring this up. I just went out Sunday to try out my first conventional reel (daiwa seagate). Practiced in my yard using 30lb mono with 6oz weight casting a couple hundred feet. Was much easier than I thought. Loaded it up with braid before heading out fishing. Got out on the rocks with it and did pretty well.

My method is to keep my thumb completely off the spool in flight. The instant it hits the water, I stop the spool. Worked very well. I'm using a 12' surf spinning rod since that's what I have. Any disadvantage to using a spinning rod?

The only issue I had was with very long casts. A few times while in mid-flight there was a minor birdnest that stopped the cast. I think those were casts where the line was following a big arc but still not sure on this. Probably at the top of the arc, the velocity of the line leaving the reel exceeds the velocity of the leader causing the birdnest. My thinking is that you need to try to send your line out like a bullet, not a mortar -- a relatively flat trajectory. Still a some lessons to learn.


Rob


Rob the disadvantage of using a spinning rod instead of a casting rod is that the spine is on the wrong side of the blank so you will not have near as much power and will run a much higher risk of snapping the rod under load.
Top of page
Send private message Make a quoted reply on this post
PFIC Message Boards >> Rod and Reel Advice/Seminars Reply to this topic
Page 3 of 4  Page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next
Display posts from previous:   
Jump to: