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PFIC Message Boards >> Rod and Reel Advice/Seminars Reply to this topic
>> Conventional Reel For Dummies? [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 4:08 pm
branrx


Posts: 85
Location: Morro Bay

Ive spent most of my life fishing with open spinning reels on fresh water. I figured it was time to 'upgrade' to a conventional reel for heavier bait and surf fishing so I experimented with a Penn I had bought and I have to say I hate these reels. I recieved some good advice from a neighbor and fisherman I met this weekend but I got to say I suck at casting these things. The learning curve for an open face reel as a kid was slightly tough, but the conventional reel is the most unfriendly reel Ive dealt with. I bird nested my casts several times despite keeping my thumb on the spool, even despite engaging the reel as the weight hit the water. This thing is rediculous. I know many of you have learned the ways of this reel but Isnt there a good casting heavy reel that is back lash proof? I dont mind staying with a spinning reel but I feel like Im cheating myself for the purpose of casting and landing heavier fish.

Anyone, your thoughts are appreciated. As of right now I plan on buying a good medium strength open reel. Morro Bay has a long gradual wave break, I want something that can cast over all the waves, Ive seen people cast the crap out of both reels several hundred yards, I just want to do this with line strong enough for sharks and rays on the surf.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 4:19 pm
seabass_seeker


Posts: 1839
Location: Clovis

What reel are you using man? It would be good to know so that we can better help you.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 4:28 pm
branrx


Posts: 85
Location: Morro Bay

Penn Squall 30ld(I bought impulsively) and Penn Level Wind 209. They both kick my ....
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 4:42 pm
gn3hzeku1


Posts: 156

On the size the handle is there is a small thumb screw thingy.. maybe you need to turns yours so when it is free reeling it doesn't fall so fast.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 5:01 pm
branrx


Posts: 85
Location: Morro Bay

gn3hzeku1 wrote:
On the size the handle is there is a small thumb screw thingy.. maybe you need to turns yours so when it is free reeling it doesn't fall so fast.


I experimented with this with no luck..lol
I just dont get the point of this reel. For the longest cast this setting should be free right? If you tighten it the cast distance is compromised. When you put your thumb on the spool the cast is compromised. And you have to know where the sinker is because you have to engage the reel as it hits the water. Are you kidding me? Isnt this reel a dinosaur? Seriously, I feel like Im learning to play an instrument..LOL
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 5:27 pm
bigred805


Posts: 365
Location: lompoc ca

if you want a conventional reel for dummies buy one with a magnetic braking system I have a couple Very Happy. while you are first learning you can crank it up and it will save you alot of grief when accidents happen. and when you get better just back it off and let it fly. although I think alot of it has to do with the line and the rod your throwing it on. Get yourself a decent 10-12 foot rod thats capable of throwing the weight and practice maybe with some old 20# mono you got lying around with 3-4 oz of weight. once you get the hang of things put 300 yards of 65# PP and fill the rest with 20-40pound mono and get at em. And the little knob on the side is your spool tension and its essential to adjust this. Yeah you potentially could get a longer cast with a faster freespool but your line can't come off the spool at the same speed as the spool thats where you get a birdnest. So tighten it down a bit and as you get a little better back it off some. Once you have it dialed in right you should only have to thumb it while its entering the water. Trust me once you get a hang of conventional you kinda question why you ever use a spinner...especially when it comes time to do maintenance...what a nightmare. infact the only time I do really is with light line and weight. BTW Dont try to cast light weights with your reel either it wont like it lol. OK ramble over.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 5:28 pm
Redkorn


Posts: 1432

Theres alot of new tech that came out in the past 8 years

Avet MC cast that I use and still get birds nets...but do the over lap runs....

Cheaper reels are Okumas lines

They have about 7 lines of reels for surf to big game. All are about 120 bucks or cheaper on ebay ($60).

Okuma cortez

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJnyy3CWBX8

okuma contoura

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aISrEOhw0w4

_________________
Get the Net!!!

http://countdownimages.org/cdwn/1_1e0_ff3333.png
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 5:28 pm
fishnchris


Posts: 39

Try breakawayusa.com if your looking for more distance. Daiwa emblem reels are great spinning reels built for distance. There's great products for getting more distance but it has more to do with your technique than gear.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:14 pm
branrx


Posts: 85
Location: Morro Bay

Appreciate it guys. I got really frustrated thinking Id nail this reel after a few casts. Ill check out the links and look into the magnetic reel. I thought my Squall had that, but could be wrong.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:16 pm
seabass_seeker


Posts: 1839
Location: Clovis

Hmmm not sure about the lever drag squall but the 209 should be easy enough to cast. Like stated, use 20lb test, a Long Rod is a must, and 4oz of weight. Casting conventionals is all about being smooth vs. being powerful. Try watching some vids on youtube to help you out.


I'm still a newb when it comes to heavy conventional casting too but here goes:

The way I cast is I let out about 3ft of line from rodtip to sinker. I put the rod over my shoulder and swing the sinker so it's closer to me and set it on the floor. What I want is for the rod to load up as soon as possible and by leaving the sinker on the sand I'm getting just that resistance.

At this point my rod is over my shoulder and at a 4 o'clock position. I swing smoothly over my shoulder and pull in with my left hand using my right hand (which is by the reel) as a fulcrum. I'll feather the spool as necessary during the sinker's flight (note, feather the spool NOT the line).

When the sinker hits the water, stop the spool by putting your thumb on it (repeat, thumb on spool not line). Only after that will I engage the reel. Hope that helps man, like I said, I'm still new at this too but I'm able to get very reliable casts now.

The knob on the left side of the 209 can be tightened to add more resistance if you are backlashing too much. Yes it will reduce casting distance. Don't know if the squall lever drag reel has a tension knob.


Last edited by seabass_seeker on Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:16 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:16 pm
branrx


Posts: 85
Location: Morro Bay

fishnchris wrote:
Try breakawayusa.com if your looking for more distance. Daiwa emblem reels are great spinning reels built for distance. There's great products for getting more distance but it has more to do with your technique than gear.


I dont mind practicing technique for distance it was the fear of the bird nesting reel that was pissing me off. Ill check this out though, thanks!
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:22 pm
branrx


Posts: 85
Location: Morro Bay

seabass_seeker wrote:
Hmmm not sure about the lever drag squall but the 209 should be easy enough to cast. Like stated, use 20lb test, a Long Rod is a must, and 4oz of weight. Casting conventionals is all about being smooth vs. being powerful. Try watching some vids on youtube to help you out.


I'm still a newb when it comes to heavy conventional casting too but here goes:

The way I cast is I let out about 3ft of line from rodtip to sinker. I put the rod over my shoulder and swing the sinker so it's closer to me and set it on the floor. What I want is for the rod to load up as soon as possible and by leaving the sinker on the sand I'm getting just that resistance.

At this point my rod is over my shoulder and at a 4 o'clock position. I swing smoothly over my shoulder and pull in with my left hand using my right hand (which is by the reel) as a fulcrum. I'll feather the spool as necessary during the sinker's flight (note, feather the spool NOT the line).

When the sinker hits the water, stop the spool by putting your thumb on it (repeat, thumb on spool not line). Only after that will I engage the reel. Hope that helps man, like I said, I'm still new at this too but I'm able to get very reliable casts now.

The knob on the left side of the 209 can be tightened to add more resistance if you are backlashing too much. Yes it will reduce casting distance. Don't know if the squall lever drag reel has a tension knob.


Yeah Squall has it. If someone is casting 200+ yards over a rough surf what happens when you lose sight of the weight? Ive casted several times in the surf and lost sight of my weight. I guess this is a dumb question, Im just not used too worrying about thumbing the spool or engaging the reel upon entry into the water.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:25 pm
seabass_seeker


Posts: 1839
Location: Clovis

Hmm I think that boils down to intuition and experience. It's pretty easy to estimate when the sinker is gonna hit the water, plus you don't have to stop it at that exact moment. You can always stop it sooner to be safe.

P.S. you dont need to engage the reel the moment the sinker hits the water. Your thumb controls the spool. Engage the reel when you want to engage the reel.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:37 pm
seabass_seeker


Posts: 1839
Location: Clovis

Here's the technique I use:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arTIwmbouJQ&feature=related
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2012 6:58 pm
Rockfish Ninja


Posts: 466

ALL the advice given has been very good, I'll just add a few more tidbits cause I use conventional reels most of the time.

-Start out small then go big, try casting at an easier location before you go out to hit the breakers. A place where you don't have to cast so far and you can get your mechanics down.

-Level wind reels tend to compromise distance by virtue of the drag the level guide adds to the equation. I use an old penn beachmaster from the late 70's, nothing fancy.

-The side adjustment counter-tension knob mentioned helps, just adjust it so your sinker doesn't drop too fast, a little tension goes a long way.

-Thumb technique is the key in my opinion, old pros at it know to slow the reel just *BEFORE* your sinker hits the water. Yes it can cut your casts shorter if you put the breaks on too early, but that's part of the mechanics of casting you seek to master.

I'm an O.G. and my eyes don't work as good as they used to so I don't do too much distance casting anymore but when I did I just read up on it & practiced.
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