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>> bullheads [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 2:38 pm
fattail1969


Posts: 16
Location: concord

Has anyone caught any recently? And if so, could you share the general area. I haven't seen one in years. TIA
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 4:48 pm
hugs86


Posts: 76

Man I'm tryna catch some too around the peninsula. Haven't seen any in so long, despite people say they are a common-annoying fish.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 8:36 pm
fattail1969


Posts: 16
Location: concord

I was thinking about trying Oyster point or the sloughs down by the airport. I've tried Rodeo and Crockett but no luck. Apparently there are a few around but trying to get people to give up their spot is like pulling teeth. Never thought you could spot burn a bullhead spot lol
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 9:18 pm
hugs86


Posts: 76

Yeah idk man. Maybe I'm completely wrong but they are rare? I see small gobies, crabs, etc along the bay but bullheads don't seem to be really commonly distributed at all, haven't found them in rocky edges or sloughs. Which is a shame, they are fascinating little fish.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 10:25 am
Ken Jones


Posts: 9461
Location: California

I haven't been up there in a while but I've never known there to be a shortage of bullheads. However, much more commonly caught in the warm weather months.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 7:27 pm
Ken Jones


Posts: 9461
Location: California

I talked to red fish about this. Not sure what's going on. As far as I know they do not move out of the bay in the wintertime although at times they do almost seem to hibernate in the mud. Hard to say.
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 8:53 am
red fish


Posts: 2559
Location: Berkeley Pier

Ken Jones wrote:
I talked to red fish about this. Not sure what's going on. As far as I know they do not move out of the bay in the wintertime although at times they do almost seem to hibernate in the mud. Hard to say.

Bullhead (staghorn sculpin) aren't even available in local bait shops in the San Francisco Bay, only mudsuckers. They spawn like half the year from about Oct-Marrch in freshwater, so their absence in the past couple years kind of baffles the mind. Perhaps an altered migration route due to environmental impact?

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 9:48 am
songslinger


Posts: 822
Location: Where Common Sense Presides

They used to be a frequent "incidental catch" species in both SF and SP bays. I don't use cut anchovies anymore (real effective in getting bullheads accidentally), but on occasion I still put out shrimp and worm offerings. I think I've caught just one pacific staghorn sculpin in the past calendar year. For that matter, other sculpins as well.

Theories abound as to their scarcity. Maybe the drought has a relationship. Or climate change, natural or man-made. I'd have to say that all the dredging and sand mining operations throughout both bays (and the Suisun) cannot be helping. There are 12 such projects and they have a 10-year lease. Any time you deplete 14%
* of the habitat in a given area it's bound to have a negative impact.

Over harvest is a real possibility. Kingfish also used to be abundant and now they have fled from places people used to catch them in high numbers. Baitshop stocking, forager stocking, and fish killed by accident or design when they are caught incidentally--these things add up.


*I am being generous here. This is based on the sand mining company (Hanson Marine) original estimate of 86% replenishment. So far, the USGS has found that this rate is more like 55:45: in other words, depletion is exceeding replenishment. Oops. But hey, we all need mounds of high quality contruction sand, and the fish can go swim somewhere else. Which they are doing.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2016 10:11 am
Germanbrown


Posts: 5

Santa Cruz pier has bullhead catch them on shrimp chovy. I catch bullhead here n use them for bait san luis reservoir.
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2016 5:31 pm
desertlakesflying


Posts: 20

songslinger wrote:
They used to be a frequent "incidental catch" species in both SF and SP bays. I don't use cut anchovies anymore (real effective in getting bullheads accidentally), but on occasion I still put out shrimp and worm offerings. I think I've caught just one pacific staghorn sculpin in the past calendar year. For that matter, other sculpins as well.

Theories abound as to their scarcity. Maybe the drought has a relationship. Or climate change, natural or man-made. I'd have to say that all the dredging and sand mining operations throughout both bays (and the Suisun) cannot be helping. There are 12 such projects and they have a 10-year lease. Any time you deplete 14%
* of the habitat in a given area it's bound to have a negative impact.

Over harvest is a real possibility. Kingfish also used to be abundant and now they have fled from places people used to catch them in high numbers. Baitshop stocking, forager stocking, and fish killed by accident or design when they are caught incidentally--these things add up.


*I am being generous here. This is based on the sand mining company (Hanson Marine) original estimate of 86% replenishment. So far, the USGS has found that this rate is more like 55:45: in other words, depletion is exceeding replenishment. Oops. But hey, we all need mounds of high quality contruction sand, and the fish can go swim somewhere else. Which they are doing.


And add all the excess fresh water being released after the delta smelt fraud.
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2016 9:59 pm
Trumbo


Posts: 852
Location: East bay

maybe try for mudsucker instead
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2016 10:38 pm
Ken Jones


Posts: 9461
Location: California

I talked to the Fish and Wildlife. They do not know the reason for the decrease. Suggested it may be due to the El Nino conditions.
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 4:40 pm
beutelevision


Posts: 84
Location: The foggy side of San Francisco

It might also be that there is no plankton left for larval fish to eat, due to invasive species. See http://www.sfgate.com/green/article/The-Great-Invaders-A-new-ecosystem-is-evolving-2523069.php[/url]
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2016 7:57 pm
Ken Jones


Posts: 9461
Location: California

beutelevision wrote:
It might also be that there is no plankton left for larval fish to eat, due to invasive species. See http://www.sfgate.com/green/article/The-Great-Invaders-A-new-ecosystem-is-evolving-2523069.php[/url]



Good article.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 20, 2016 8:01 am
Fusion


Posts: 106

I used to catch them in Pinole. Theres a slough there. I forgot the street but it's next to some type of oil refinery or propane company. When the wind blows north and high tide at night. Boy you'll get tired of releasing the stripers. Wear waders the water is cold. I had a huge striper (i think) swam n bumped into my leg. Scarred
The heck outta me. My friends had their stripers tied to their boat and a seven gill ate them all.

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