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PFIC Message Boards >> Fishery Conservation, Management and Politics This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.
>> The Decline of Striped Bass [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 4:10 pm
henry408


Posts: 68

Some on the board may think the decline of the Striped Bass population is due to overfishing. But, I beg to differ. There are many reasons for the decline of Striped Bass population but fishermen is not one of them. Here are some of the main ones:

1. Massive water exports to Central Valley and Southern California are destroying the ecosystem of the Delta.

2. Powerful pumps at state and federal water project facilities have been killing millions of fish and sucking up much of the aquatic food supply.

3. DFG stopped its Striped Bass stocking program.

http://www.delta.dfg.ca.gov/stripedbass/QuestionoftheMonth.asp?quid=0
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 4:15 pm
henry408


Posts: 68

Many of the newer anglers may not know this but DF&G used to stock the Delta with Stiped Bass in the 80's and 90's. DF&G stopped its stocking program completely in 2002

http://www.delta.dfg.ca.gov/stripedbass/QuestionoftheMonth.asp?quid=0

From the DF&G Website:

============================================================================

Department of Fish and Game, Central Valley Bay-Delta Branch
Striped Bass Information Page

Striped Bass Stamp Fund

How is my $3.50 used?


Introduction


In 1981, striped bass anglers proposed and lobbied successfully for legislation to create a striped bass fishing stamp to generate funds for striped bass restoration. This legislation established an annual $3.70 Striped Bass Stamp, with revenues to be spent by the DFG on preservation and enhancement of striped bass in California. The stamp has generated over $17 million over the years.

Annual budgets are formulated with the assistance of a public Striped Bass Stamp Fund Advisory Committee appointed by the Director of the DFG. This committee consists of eight representatives of the striped bass angling community and interested citizens. Two approaches have been used to improve fishing, including programs that will immediately provide more fish for anglers and research programs to determine factors that affect the striped bass population in the Estuary.

Programs that are currently fully or partly supported by the Striped Bass Stamp Fund include increased law enforcement operations, annual surveys of the distribution and abundance of young bass during their first year of life, monitoring programs designed to determine adult abundance and the effectiveness of stocking young striped bass, screening of agricultural water diversions, and monitoring striped bass food habits.

Past programs that have been funded with Striped Bass Stamp monies include the DFG Striped Bass Hatchery, 1982–1991, the DFG Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory, juvenile striped bass stocking and tagging programs, the Lake Havasu Spawning Behavior Project, population modeling, and bass die-off studies.

Of all of the programs sponsored by the Striped Bass Stamp Fund, the most popular by far with anglers has been juvenile stocking and tagging. From 1980 to 2001, over 13 million captive-reared juvenile striped bass have been stocked in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary. Of these, a little less than half were marked with coded-wire tags or, in the early years of stocking, freeze brands and fin clips that can be used to identify the fish. The information from recoveries of marked fish has been used to determine which location is best for stocking; which size and age groups survived best; and whether captive-raised fish make a contribution to the restoration of the legal-sized striped bass population. Results indicate that San Pablo Bay is the best place for stocking; that larger or older fish survive better; and that the contribution of captive-raised fish has been as high as 26 percent of the population in 1993, but has since declined to only two to six percent, even as the legal-sized population increased dramatically.

Currently (2002), no captive-reared juvenile striped bass are being stocked in the estuary. This is the result of stipulations in the Incidental Take Permit for the stocking of large numbers of striped bass issued to the DFG by the National Marine Fisheries Service and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2000. This permit was necessary because of potential predation by the stocked stripers on several species listed under the federal Endangered Species Act. The permit and its associated Conservation Plan for the Striped Bass Management Program require adjustments in the stocking level if two consecutive legal-sized bass population estimates exceed 950,000. And that is what happened. When population estimates became available for both 1996 (1 million) and 1998 (1.3 million), it was apparent that the criterion for reevaluation of stocking had been exceeded. The federal agencies determined that the appropriate adjustment was to suspend stocking as long as the legal-sized population remained above 950,000 fish. This suspension of stocking likely will have a minimal impact on the striped bass population, as only two to six percent of legal-sized fish have been captive-reared in recent years, when the population has been high.

The Striped Bass Stamp was created in 1981 to generate funds to help “…preserve and restore the striped bass fishery in California…”
The Striped Bass Stamp Fund includes money from striped bass stamp fees and mitigation money from other agencies. Stamp fees are required by law to be used to increase the abundance of striped bass. The mitigation money is deposited into the striped bass stamp fund to help restore striped bass populations. These funds are used for a variety of striped bass projects. Enforcement

Population Studies

Research

Mitigation

Screening

Ecosystem Restoration

Management


Historically, the Striped Bass Stamp Fund has purchased yearling and two year-old stripers to plant in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary. Stocking was discontinued in 2001 due to a significant increase in the striped bass population and requirements in DFG’s federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) permits. In addition to stocking striped bass over the last few years, the Striped Bass Stamp also funds overtime and equipment for wardens; on-going population studies; striped bass research; screening; and soon they will pay for alternative ways to enhance striped bass.

The Department is developing a Striped Bass Enhancement Alternative Strategy. Basically this is a suite of activities that benefit striped bass without exceeding the limits of our Conservation Plan. Our goal through the enhancement strategy is to enhance estuarine fish (stay in compliance with the Conservation Plan) and provide benefits to striped bass. We have coordinated with many experts and we are in the final phases of completing the strategy. Currently, we are looking into a suite of activities including: increase enforcement, habitat improvements such as floodplain restoration, improvements for fish salvaged at the pumping facilities, diversion screening in areas where striped bass are most vulnerable, research, and increased public outreach. We hope to have this plan finalized by the end of this month. Your $3.50 a year is an excellent investment in the future of striped bass.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 4:17 pm
iamap


Posts: 474

Good info...
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 5:21 pm
norcalkat


Posts: 73
Location: San Jose

thank you for this information. great read.
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 10:38 pm
piemel


Posts: 275

salmon > striper
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 12:06 am
sandcrab


Posts: 29

henry408 wrote:
Some on the board may think the decline of the Striped Bass population is due to overfishing. But, I beg to differ. There are many reasons for the decline of Striped Bass population but fishermen is not one of them. Here are some of the main ones:

1. Massive water exports to Central Valley and Southern California are destroying the ecosystem of the Delta.

2. Powerful pumps at state and federal water project facilities have been killing millions of fish and sucking up much of the aquatic food supply.

3. DFG stopped its Striped Bass stocking program.

http://www.delta.dfg.ca.gov/stripedbass/QuestionoftheMonth.asp?quid=0


Numbers 1 and 2 are the same, and I enjoy fresh produce from the Central Valley. SoCal people being able to drink is negotiable.

Unless the striper people can get some serious financial backing like the Salmon Tards and Water Contractors - we're thucked.

But don't despair, we have the Coalition for a Sustainable Delta fighting hard as we speak.http://www.sustainabledelta.com/pdf/StripedBassLawsuit.pdf
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 6:34 am
tomaurand


Posts: 52

[quote="sandcrab"]
sandcrab wrote:


But don't despair, we have the Coalition for a Sustainable Delta fighting hard as we speak.http://www.sustainabledelta.com/pdf/StripedBassLawsuit.pdf


you may want to research this "Coalition for a sustainable Delta, they are suing the DFG right now because of the striped bass' game fish status:



CSPA Defends the Striped Bass's Right to Exist!

CSPA's Mike Jackson ready to defend the beleaguered Delta Striped Bass in federal court on July 14

By Jerry Neuburger

July 7, 2008. With only a week to go before Judge Wanger's federal district court convenes, CSPA attorney, Mike Jackson, is prepared to intervene in the case of the Coalition for a Sustainable Delta et al vs. The California Department of Fish and Game and the California Fish and Game Commission.

Jackson has over 20 years court experience in fisheries and environmental law, acting as CSPA's attorney in numerous state and federal issues. Jackson, in defending DFG and the Commission, will be representing the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance, the California Striped Bass Association and the Northern California Council of the Federation of Fly Fishers.

Opposing him are a group of Kern County water agencies posing as environmentalists under the title of The Coalition for a Sustainable Delta. These agencies are consumers of vast amounts of water pumped south through both the state and federal conveyances. A healthy striped bass fishery is a major obstacle in their ever increasing need for delta water since that fishery and the recreational anglers fishing for them represent a sizable lobby more interested in a healthy delta than desert farming of marginal lands using taxpayer heavily subsidized water for cash crops by corporate agri-business.

The Coalition alleges that the Delta Striped Bass is a voracious predator and is one of the prime causes of the collapse of the endangered Delta Smelt and Sacramento Valley Chinook Salmon. They make this claim even though there is no credible evidence that such predation takes place and in fact, the striped bass fishery, the Delta Smelt fishery and the Chinook Salmon fishery have all collapsed at a parallel rate. This rate has drastically accelerated in the last five years. During this same time, exports of water south have increased as much as thirty percent when compared to previous records.

When Bill Jennings, Executive Director of CSPA, heard of the suit he exclaimed, "Striped bass have coexisted with salmon and smelt in the Delta estuary for more than a hundred years. The dramatic almost 30% increase in the amount of water exported in recent years is the one clear culprit that has led to population crashes of numerous species; including salmon, steelhead, striped bass, Delta smelt, longfin smelt, splittail, threadfin shad, among others!"

Thsuit is seen by most as another means of delay and of obfuscating the real issues surrounding the collapse of all the delta fisheries, the lack of sufficient water for the continued health of the delta. Some believe the powerful water agencies are attempting to extend the debate until the collapse of the fisheries is complete and the once vocal angler and environmental groups fade away. With no one to defend the delta, even more water will be justified as a necessary export for the increasingly voracious demands of southland corporate agri-business.

The issue of the striped bass's predation has been researched and all data indicates that the species does not target either Delta Smelt or Chinook Salmon smolts as a part of its diet. In a recent study, "Diet composition in San Francisco Estuary striped bass: does trophic adaptability have its limits?" By Matthew L. Nobriga & Frederick Feyrer, completed in May of 2008, the researchers document the contents of striper stomachs that were examined over in several studies that took place in a period of over 40 years. In these studies the examiners found that a striped bass's diet consists of less than a half of one percent of Chinook salmon and an even slightly smaller amount of Delta Smelt. While the estuary has changed drastically in those! years and the striper's diet has changed with it, threadfin shad and juvenile stripers have consistently shown themselves to be the main finny prey of the Delta Striper.

While motives for the suit are obvious, CSPA, CSBA and the NCCFFF are not taking the outcome of the suit for granted. At stake is the very existence of the Delta Striped Bass. If the Coalition for the Sustainable Delta were to win this suit, it is expected that all DFG management of the Delta Striped Bass fishery would cease. That includes size and bag limits and method of take. Anglers could even be ordered per DFG regs to kill any striped bass caught regardless of size. For a fishery in trouble such as the Delta Striped Bass, this lack of regulation would be the death knell.

CSPA has meager funds for supporting the costs of the intervention, the issue is so important that the CSPA Board of Directors felt they had no choice but to join the suit. In order to properly defend the striper's right to exist and its place as one of California's premier game fish. CSPA is requesting that all concerned anglers help contribute to the defense fund coffers in this battle. Those wishing to donate can do so by mail by printing out a CSPA membership form at http://www.calsport.org/membership.htm or can contribute on line using their credit cards via PayPal at http://www.calsport.org/paypal.htm. Donors need not be members of PayPal to use this service.


Last edited by tomaurand on Wed Jul 16, 2008 6:53 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 6:44 am
henry408


Posts: 68

sandcrab wrote:
henry408 wrote:
Some on the board may think the decline of the Striped Bass population is due to overfishing. But, I beg to differ. There are many reasons for the decline of Striped Bass population but fishermen is not one of them. Here are some of the main ones:

1. Massive water exports to Central Valley and Southern California are destroying the ecosystem of the Delta.

2. Powerful pumps at state and federal water project facilities have been killing millions of fish and sucking up much of the aquatic food supply.

3. DFG stopped its Striped Bass stocking program.

http://www.delta.dfg.ca.gov/stripedbass/QuestionoftheMonth.asp?quid=0


Numbers 1 and 2 are the same, and I enjoy fresh produce from the Central Valley. SoCal people being able to drink is negotiable.

Unless the striper people can get some serious financial backing like the Salmon Tards and Water Contractors - we're thucked.

But don't despair, we have the Coalition for a Sustainable Delta fighting hard as we speak.http://www.sustainabledelta.com/pdf/StripedBassLawsuit.pdf


Number 2 is a problem that can be somewhat fixed by installing modern fish screens that would reduce fish kills.

Coalition for a Sustainable Delta is a coalition of Central Valley water interest groups trying to pump more water from the Delta. They are claiming CDFG's striped bass policy in the past contributed to the decline of delta smelt.

From your link:

Plaintiff Coalition for a Sustainable Delta (“Coalition”) is comprised of agricultural water
users in the San Joaquin Valley. Coalition members depend on State Water Project (“SWP”) deliveries
from the Delta to the San Joaquin Valley for their water supply.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 9:03 am
Ken Jones


Posts: 9444
Location: California

Tomaurand, you beat me to it!

The “Coalition for a Sustainable Delta” is the enemy of those fighting to keep the striped bass as a sustainable species in the Delta.

As you report, and as I stated in another thread, it is made up of water interests and several salmon/trout groups that blame the stripers for the decline in salmon. If they win, the water exports will continue and possibly increase.

Most knowledgeable anglers feel that the water exports (both the quantity and the time of the year the water is removed) are the main cause of the decline in the Delta and that the “Coalition” is a smokescreen name aiming to confuse the public and anglers. The California Sportfishing Protection Alliance (of which UPSAC is a member) is fighting against the falsely named Coalition for a Sustainable Delta and has made some progress although the fight is far from finished.

_________________
Support UPSAC! Preserve pier and shore angling in California.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 9:18 am
piemel


Posts: 275

face!
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 9:56 am
tomaurand


Posts: 52

ken jones wrote:
Tomaurand, you beat me to it!

The “Coalition for a Sustainable Delta” is the enemy of those fighting to keep the striped bass as a sustainable species in the Delta.

As you report, and as I stated in another thread, it is made up of water interests and several salmon/trout groups that blame the stripers for the decline in salmon. If they win, the water exports will continue and possibly increase.

Most knowledgeable anglers feel that the water exports (both the quantity and the time of the year the water is removed) are the main cause of the decline in the Delta and that the “Coalition” is a smokescreen name aiming to confuse the public and anglers. The California Sportfishing Protection Alliance (of which UPSAC is a member) is fighting against the falsely named Coalition for a Sustainable Delta and has made some progress although the fight is far from finished.


Hi Ken, long time no speak Smile
Yup, I hate the fact that they are operating under the guise as a group actually concerned about the Delta.
Have you heard anything about the case yet?
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 10:43 am
sandcrab


Posts: 29

haha, sarcasm people! i posted a link to the lawsuit filing itself hahahaha.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 11:14 am
piemel


Posts: 275

FAIL!
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 12:44 pm
sandcrab


Posts: 29

piemel wrote:
FAIL!


DURRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR. STFUaF.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 3:02 pm
piemel


Posts: 275

OKTHXBAI!!!
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PFIC Message Boards >> Fishery Conservation, Management and Politics This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.
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