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>> Herring 2014 [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 8:58 pm
MsCMSchultz


Posts: 1287
Location: BUIDB: "Thats a great shot of a pier from the beach."

Herring Tempura:

Although the fish can be fried whole, for this, I prefer fillets.

1 cup cheap beer, flat and at room temperature
1 cup flour
1 beaten egg
Whatever cooking oil you prefer

Heat oil in a heavy pot to 375

Whisk together the beer, flour and egg in a bowl; doesn't have to be smooth and don't overdo it.

Let it sit for 5 minutes.

Dip the fillets in the batter, letting excess drain back in bowl (I like to use bamboo chopsticks for this.)

Place in oil--don't crowd the pot. Fry until golden brown, turning over if necessary. Remove with tongs and let drain on racks lined with paper towels.

Incidentally, you can use the same batter for mussels tempura, etc.

This website gives you recipes for two dipping sauces, neither of which were to my taste; but when I mixed the two sauces, to me, it was more palatable:
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Fried-Beer-Battered-Mussels-with-Two-Sauces-106357

I watched my friend do this; I tried this at home and devised this:


Herring Roe, the Eggs

Carefully rinse the pairs of roe, leaving the sac intact.

In a non-aluminum container, place a layer of kosher salt. Lay the roe on the salt, not touching each other and cover with another layer of salt--doesn't have to be a thick layer; repeat and end with layer of salt.

Let sit in fridge 24 hours.

Remove from dish, rinse thoroughly to remove salt (peeling off the roe sac helps) dress with a blend of soy sauce, sugar and vinegar.

Herring Roe, the Milt

Before you all gag or get all silly on me, I didn't think I would like it at all; much to my surprise, both hubby and I enjoyed it; it's kinda like a fishy egg yolk.

Remove the pairs of roe from the male herring and clean thoroughly.

Dredge in flour, seasoned cornmeal or bread crumbs.

In a cast iron skillet, lightly coat the bottom with butter and/or oil (I like to use half oil, half butter).

Pan fry the roe, turning carefully.

Serve on toast, crackers, or over rice.


Herring Prepared Saba Style

My friend also suggested making the herring the same way as saba is served in sushi bars; this website gave me some direction, http://thejanechannel.com/2011/05/12/shime-saba/.

This is how I synthesized and adapted saba style herring:

Layer your filets in kosher salt several hours minimum, 24 hours maximum.

Rinse well in cold water, removing as much of the salt as possible.

Place in non-aluminum container and cover the filets with rice vinegar.

Let marinate several hours.

Rinse and peel away whatever skin you can (or not).

By golly, it does have the taste and texture of saba.

Hope someone enjoys these recipes.

If pictures will help, I will try to post tomorrow or by the end of the week.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 9:25 pm
MsCMSchultz


Posts: 1287
Location: BUIDB: "Thats a great shot of a pier from the beach."

One other thing

If you end up with stinky hands, sink and kitchen/house after all the fish:

Wash your hands with lemon juice or vinegar.

For the sink, if you have a garbage disposal, cut some lemons or limes, drop them in the disposal and turn it on. Then pour baking soda down the drain. Add a good dose of vinegar. Doing this just before a load of dishes in dishwasher helps.

In a wider rather than narrower pot, heat up water to a simmer. Add cinnamon, cloves, allspice, anise or any combination and let simmer so that the vapors waft thru the house.

Or, eucalyptus pods are real good too.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 12:00 am
seabass_seeker


Posts: 1839
Location: Clovis

I've only recently (this past year) tried fish milt and yes I agree, pretty dang good stuff. I'm not throwing it away any longer, makes a good snack with beer.
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 8:53 am
MsCMSchultz


Posts: 1287
Location: BUIDB: "Thats a great shot of a pier from the beach."

seabass_seeker wrote:
I've only recently (this past year) tried fish milt and yes I agree, pretty dang good stuff. I'm not throwing it away any longer, makes a good snack with beer.


Hey, thanks for the confirmation and affirmation, seabass; telling people that fish milt is good is as much fun as telling them that we (that would be my current husband and I) spent Christmas with my ex-father-in-law.

And I STILL wonder why people look at me funny! Smile

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 11:10 am
MsCMSchultz


Posts: 1287
Location: BUIDB: "Thats a great shot of a pier from the beach."

One More

For the 10 +/- 9 people checking this thread:

The universe smiled upon me in the field and on the water. I came upon some wild fennel in springlike growth--fragrant, tasty, tender "bud" in the middle, so i harvested the fronds. I also came upon some fresh herring.

I scoured the internet for some more recipes and came upon many for Italian "pasta with sardines and fennel" recipes.

Sooooo, I came up with Pasta with Herring and Fennel.

I found it best to simmer the fronds for 10 minutes; when I straight sauteed the fronds, they were kinda--tough.

Clean, filet and cut the herring into 1" pieces.

Simmer the fennel for 10-15 minutes, cool and chop.

Sautee a chopped onion in oil; when soft, add the herring and sautee just before completely done and add the fennel. Simmer all until hot.

Add hot cooked pasta and toss.

To me it sounds like an odd combination; hubby likes it; me, not so much. but I will try it again this week. It IS a very pretty dish.

Variations include tomatoes, dried or fresh, raisins, bread crumbs, pine nuts--some of which I try in the future.

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