pierfishing.com :: FAQ :: search :: memberlist :: album
  Sign-up as new user :: log in



Sign-up as new user | I forgot my password

PFIC Message Boards >> Fishery Conservation, Management and Politics Reply to this topic
>> California Dept. of Fish and Game Announcements [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 9:27 pm
gyozadude


Posts: 181
Location: South Bay

Here's a May 9, 2008 Rockfish Announcement:

California Department of Fish and Game
News Release for Immediate Release May 9, 2008

DFG Announces Changes to Recreational Groundfish 2008 Fishing
Regulations

Contact:
John Budrick, Associate Marine Fisheries Biologist (650) 413-1501
Carrie Wilson, DFG Office of Communications (831) 649-7191

Emergency regulations to restrict recreational fishing for groundfish
in northern California to depths of less than 120 feet went into effect
today. The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) announced that the
regulations are now effective in both state and federal waters. The new
depth restriction began May 1 in federal waters (3 to 200 miles from
shore) from Pigeon Point to the Oregon border when the recreational
groundfish season opened. This depth restriction is necessary to
minimize contact with yelloweye rockfish and the possibility of an early
fishery closure.

The season, area and depth restrictions (listed by management area) for
boat-based anglers will be as follows:

NORTHERN MANAGEMENT AREA - OREGON BORDER TO 40°10' NORTH LATITUDE (NEAR
CAPE MENDOCINO, HUMBOLDT COUNTY)

● Rockfish, cabezon, greenlings (RCG Complex) and other federal
groundfish (other than lingcod): Open to boat-based anglers from May 1
through Dec. 31 in waters from 0 to 120 feet (0 to 20 fathoms).

● Lingcod: Open to boat-based anglers from May 1 through Nov. 30 in
waters from 0 to 120 feet (0 to 20 fathoms).

NORTH-CENTRAL MANAGEMENT AREA - 40°10' NORTH LATITUDE (NEAR CAPE
MENDOCINO, HUMBOLDT COUNTY), TO 37° 11’ NORTH LATITUDE (NEAR PIGEON
POINT, SAN MATEO COUNTY)

● Rockfish, cabezon, greenlings (RCG Complex) and other federal
groundfish (other than lingcod): Open to boat-based anglers from June 1
through Nov. 30 in waters from 0 to 120 feet (0 to 20 fathoms).

● Lingcod: Open to boat-based anglers from June 1 through Nov. 30 in
waters from 0 to 120 feet (0 to 20 fathoms).

Anglers are encouraged to visit the DFG Web site at
www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/education.asp to find information about ways to
minimize impacts on yelloweye and canary rockfish, contribute to the
recovery of fish populations and help avoid an in-season closure. DFG
recommends the following steps to reduce take of these species:

● Know all rockfish species and regulations and learn to distinguish
prohibited species.

● Avoid rocky areas like pinnacles where yelloweye rockfish are
known to live.

● If yelloweye or canary rockfish are encountered when fishing, move
to a different location to reduce contact with these species.

● Use methods to return fish back down to depths that reduce gas
expansion injuries (pressure shock or barotrauma). For information about
gas expansion injuries and descending devices visit
www.dfg.ca.gov/marine/pdfs/release.pdf.

● Report catches and encounters to samplers accurately.

For more information regarding recreational groundfish regulations and
to stay informed of in-season regulation changes, please call the
groundfish hotline (831) 649-2801, or visit DFG’s Marine Region Web
site at www.dfg.ca.gov/marine.

_________________
Yes, I can roll potsticker skins!
Top of page
Send private message Visit poster's website Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2008 1:12 pm
gyozadude


Posts: 181
Location: South Bay

MLPA Blue Ribbon Task Force and Fish and Game Commission Meeting Announcement

California Marine Life Protection Act Initiative Announcement

Who: MLPA Blue Ribbon Task Force and the California Fish and Game Commission

What: Joint meeting to formally transmit the north central coast marine protected area recommendations

When: Wednesday, June 11 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Where: Sacramento, California (specific location to be determined and posted with agenda next week)

_________________
Yes, I can roll potsticker skins!
Top of page
Send private message Visit poster's website Make a quoted reply on this post
PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 8:45 am
gyozadude


Posts: 181
Location: South Bay

California Department of Fish and Game

NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 08050 June 5, 2008

Contact: Carrie Wilson, DFG Office of Communications,
CalOutdoors@dfg.ca.gov

California Outdoors Q&As
www.dfg.ca.gov/QandA
Trout, Hunting Radios & Guide Licenses

Question: I’ve just heard that it is against the law for us to keep
trout alive in our boat’s livewell while we continue fishing. We’ve
often done this in the past to keep the fish alive and healthy so that
we can have the option of releasing them later if we are lucky enough to
catch larger fish. Is this really not legal? (Jim B.)

Answer: This practice is illegal for a number of reasons, and over the
years a lot of trout fishermen have been cited for doing just what you
describe. Here's what California law states on the matter: 1) “No
trout may be maintained or possessed in a live condition in any
container on or attached to any boat” (ref. Section 4.00[e].)

Once an angler has a limit of trout (or a limit of any species) in
possession, the angler may not continue fishing for more in an attempt
to trade larger fish caught with smaller fish already in possession or
in their livewell. This practice would be called “upgrading” or
“high grading” and is illegal everywhere.

Catch and release fishing for trout is also not allowed once the bag
limit is filled. The primary reason for this is because to “… pursue,
catch, capture or kill fish … or attempting to do so” is still defined
as “take” (ref. Section 1.80). Also, there is no assurance that any
returned fish will survive for the long-term following release, and this
translates to over harvest. (ref. Section 7.00).

The only way for an angler to continue fishing at this point is if they
change location, tactics, bait and/or gear to clearly target other
species, such as bass or crappie. After doing all of this, if any trout
are accidentally caught but then immediately released, there should be
no violation.


Question: It seems to me that at every duck club where I’ve hunted,
everybody has a two-way radio to communicate with each other. These guys
will use these radios to advise their buddies in the next blind down the
pond when a flock or a big “greenhead” is about to drop into their
set of decoys. Is this legal? I have heard that it is not legal but
would like to know the real scoop. (Jeff, Santa Cruz)

Answer: While many may argue that this practice is unethical and
unsportsmanlike, according to Capt. Liz Schwall, there are no laws on
the books against it. Although this practice may give the hunters doing
it an unfair advantage over the game, a law banning this practice would
be extremely difficult to enforce.


Question: Do I need a guide’s license if I take people out in the
ocean in kayaks and show them where and how to fish?

Answer: If you are physically there and are charging the people for
your service to show them where or how to fish and receiving any
compensation at all, you must first secure a guide license from the
Department of Fish and Game (DFG). The cost is $177.75 per year for a
California resident.

The official definition of a “Guide” is, “Any person who is
engaged in the business of packing or guiding, or who, for compensation,
assists another person in taking or attempting to take any bird, mammal,
fish, amphibian, or reptile. “Guide” also includes “Any person
who, for profit, transports other persons, their equipment, or both to
or from hunting or fishing areas.”

If you merely rent the kayaks to the people fishing, and point to an
area or tell them where to go, then you are not GUIDING them and do not
need a guide license.


Question: How does the DFG determine what the legal minimum size
should be for those fish species that have size limits? Is the size
based on reproductive maturity? (Henry G.)

Answer: Yes, in most cases the minimum size limit is based on size at
maturity. The size limit is typically intended to allow fish to breed at
least once before becoming available to the fishery.

* * *
Carrie Wilson is a marine biologist with the California Department of
Fish and Game. Her DFG-related question and answer column appears weekly
at www.dfg.ca.gov/QandA/. While she cannot personally answer
everyone’s questions, she will select a few to answer each week.
Please contact her at cwilson@dfg.ca.gov.
Top of page
Send private message Visit poster's website Make a quoted reply on this post
PFIC Message Boards >> Fishery Conservation, Management and Politics Reply to this topic
Page 1 of 1  
Display posts from previous:   
Jump to: