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>> surfperch recipe [topic: previous/next]
PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:37 pm
maki909


Posts: 225
Location: San Bernardino county

I heard that bbq a surfperch is tasty. I catch a lot of redtail, stipped, and sometimes pile surfperch. I usually fry them but they have been comin out a little mushy. I've never bbq one before nor do I know how to bbq one. Is there a certain way to bbq them? Do u fillet them still? any suggestions would be helpful.
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 10, 2011 10:20 pm
rockcrab62


Posts: 525

The meat will still be mushy, probably even more mushy than opposed to frying. If I did it, I would bbq the fish whole, and score the sides and fill them with spices. I'd also stuff the body cavity with rosemary, lemon, and maybe butter. Foil helps it not stick.
I like creole spices or old bay.

Redtails are probably the best eating out of the group you mentioned. They're moving a lot more through the surf, so they're meat is generally less mushy than say, a striped perch, because striped perch generally just chill in kelp forests or on reefs, and thus have more mushy meat.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 1:18 am
maki909


Posts: 225
Location: San Bernardino county

rockcrab62 wrote:
The meat will still be mushy, probably even more mushy than opposed to frying. If I did it, I would bbq the fish whole, and score the sides and fill them with spices. I'd also stuff the body cavity with rosemary, lemon, and maybe butter. Foil helps it not stick.
I like creole spices or old bay.

Redtails are probably the best eating out of the group you mentioned. They're moving a lot more through the surf, so they're meat is generally less mushy than say, a striped perch, because striped perch generally just chill in kelp forests or on reefs, and thus have more mushy meat.

thanks rockcab. I'll try out the recipe.
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 9:18 am
thefrood


Posts: 1293
Location: Southern California (Riverside County)

Has anyone ever tried slow-cooking perch over low temperature coals? kind of a half-smoke? Seems like the biggest thing I've heard about perch is about unpleasant texture but nobody has said anything about the flavor...

Slow-roasting over coals would give the moisture time to evaporate or drip off without overcooking the flesh so it seems like while the fish would perhaps be a bit chewy you could avoid having it be too mushy...

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2011 10:02 am
rockcrab62


Posts: 525

That's a good idea, Scott. That would probably work. Generally, perch have pretty decent flavor, except for maybe striped perch, who often have an iodine flavor to them.
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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 9:50 am
kaneohe


Posts: 213

Can't you just fry them longer/hotter to get them firmer? One thing I've noticed is that the second side being fried often comes out better/crispier/firmer........my model to explain that is the the electric skillet that I use is not at the right temp when I start (even tho setting is correct). However when fish is flipped over, skillet has had x more minutes to get to temp , so is hotter. If I had waited longer to put fish in, first side would have been better.
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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 10:31 am
maki909


Posts: 225
Location: San Bernardino county

kaneohe wrote:
Can't you just fry them longer/hotter to get them firmer? One thing I've noticed is that the second side being fried often comes out better/crispier/firmer........my model to explain that is the the electric skillet that I use is not at the right temp when I start (even tho setting is correct). However when fish is flipped over, skillet has had x more minutes to get to temp , so is hotter. If I had waited longer to put fish in, first side would have been better.

we have tried the leaving it in longer, but that only results in burning the outside of the fillet, and going hotter is actually counter productive because it cooks the outside faster than the inside so it will be even more mushy on the inside than if you cooked it at a low temp and slowly let it cook all the way through. We dont really flip them because we use a small deep fryer to fry our fish, but I've never used a skillet so maybe I will have to give that a try.
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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 11:39 am
seabass_seeker


Posts: 1839
Location: Clovis

BBQ is great! Like thefrood says, slowly cooking them over coals is a really good way to pull some moisture out of the meat. Season however you like, spray some non-stick cooking spray on the grill, and go for it. While camping at the beach, I'll not even scale perch and just remove the skin+scales once the fish is done.
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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 12:45 pm
kaneohe


Posts: 213

maki909 wrote:
[
we have tried the leaving it in longer, but that only results in burning the outside of the fillet, and going hotter is actually counter productive because it cooks the outside faster than the inside so it will be even more mushy on the inside than if you cooked it at a low temp and slowly let it cook all the way through. We dont really flip them because we use a small deep fryer to fry our fish, but I've never used a skillet so maybe I will have to give that a try.


I've never used a deep fryer but perhaps your idea of trying the skillet is worth a try...just for comparison anyway. Not a cook but I've heard this idea about searing meat to lock in the juices......perhaps the deep fryer does such a good job of locking in the juices so mushy results. This might be a difficult optimization problem......not sufficient to be hot enough, but like the 3 bears story, not too hot or too cold but just right. As I mentioned, I often see the 2 sides phenomenon where the 2nd side is nice & crispy & not too mushy vs the 1st side where the skin is soft and mushier........

Maybe you'll get a Nobel prize if you solve this universal problem Smile
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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 7:48 pm
maki909


Posts: 225
Location: San Bernardino county

kaneohe wrote:
I've never used a deep fryer but perhaps your idea of trying the skillet is worth a try...just for comparison anyway. Not a cook but I've heard this idea about searing meat to lock in the juices......perhaps the deep fryer does such a good job of locking in the juices so mushy results. This might be a difficult optimization problem......not sufficient to be hot enough, but like the 3 bears story, not too hot or too cold but just right. As I mentioned, I often see the 2 sides phenomenon where the 2nd side is nice & crispy & not too mushy vs the 1st side where the skin is soft and mushier........

Maybe you'll get a Nobel prize if you solve this universal problem Smile

hahaha. Believe me I'm not a cook either, but my friends are pretty good at cooking so I just eat what they make and give them recopies and different ways to cook things to try out.

I would not mind a nobel prize. hahaha it would look good right next to all of my fishing tackle.
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PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 2:06 pm
Salvelinus


Posts: 166
Location: Arcata/Los Osos

I've recently started frying up breaded clams, and then after i egg/bread them, i throw them in the freezer until they firm up before frying. Ive been meaning to try this same method the next time I get some perch because suprise suprise, I find them mushy too
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PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 11:28 pm
maki909


Posts: 225
Location: San Bernardino county

Salvelinus wrote:
I've recently started frying up breaded clams, and then after i egg/bread them, i throw them in the freezer until they firm up before frying. Ive been meaning to try this same method the next time I get some perch because suprise suprise, I find them mushy too

that is a good idea. I might try that.
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PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2011 11:41 pm
bigunindaboat


Posts: 2758

Ive tried baking, frying, whole, filleted

I just don't keep perch anymore. They can be a blast to catch tho.

If you find a way to firm them up let us know!

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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 12:30 am
maki909


Posts: 225
Location: San Bernardino county

bigunindaboat wrote:
Ive tried baking, frying, whole, filleted

I just don't keep perch anymore. They can be a blast to catch tho.

If you find a way to firm them up let us know!

I sure will but I almost want to give up on them. Seems like a waste to kill all those surfperch juss to experiment on how to cook them hahahaha, but if it's for the good of the forum then it has to be done hahaha.
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 11, 2011 5:27 pm
paddio


Posts: 113
Location: Central Coast

kaneohe wrote:
...Not a cook but I've heard this idea about searing meat to lock in the juices......
Searing meat does not lock in juices. It just forms a crust and carmelizes the outside to make a steak taste better. Sear high heat, reduce to low heat and finish cooking, then rest for at least five minutes. If you do not let red meat rest, you will have dry, bad steaks every time.
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